Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Nov. 3, 2008, 12:19 p.m.

Mapping the news

Two interesting (and still in beta) mapping applications present the news in new ways:

— The downright quantum TimeSpace from The Washington Post, which “allows users to navigate through hundreds of photos, video, articles, tweets, posts and audio related to the national election from around the country.” (Further evidence that “tweet” may be penetrating farther into the language than I’d have imagined.)

— The Seattle Times’ Mapping the News, which features an ever-shifting globe showing what seem to be randomly pulled news stories tied to specific places. (There’s also a slightly more traditional local edition for Seattle-area stories.)

I don’t know if a geographic interface will ever be the main way anyway takes in the news, but it’s good to see some fresh experiments.

POSTED     Nov. 3, 2008, 12:19 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
Gannett owns two college newspapers in Florida — it’s closed one and cutting costs at the other.
Where does local TV news fit in the digital age? Tegna, a year separated from Gannett, has some ideas
“By following the lead of our employees to create content that is digital first, it frees them up from the sameness of format that is plaguing local television news.”
Report: The New York Times is expanding to Australia and Canada
Having faced some difficulties with an earlier era’s attempts in large non-English markets, the Times is turning its focus next to more familiar territory.