Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Feeds will open up to new user-determined filters
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Nov. 3, 2008, 12:19 p.m.

Mapping the news

Two interesting (and still in beta) mapping applications present the news in new ways:

— The downright quantum TimeSpace from The Washington Post, which “allows users to navigate through hundreds of photos, video, articles, tweets, posts and audio related to the national election from around the country.” (Further evidence that “tweet” may be penetrating farther into the language than I’d have imagined.)

— The Seattle Times’ Mapping the News, which features an ever-shifting globe showing what seem to be randomly pulled news stories tied to specific places. (There’s also a slightly more traditional local edition for Seattle-area stories.)

I don’t know if a geographic interface will ever be the main way anyway takes in the news, but it’s good to see some fresh experiments.

POSTED     Nov. 3, 2008, 12:19 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Feeds will open up to new user-determined filters
“After this year’s fake news and Russian micro-targeting fiascos, Facebook and others will be forced to loosen their grip over our algorithmically determined timelines to other alternatives if they want to keep our attention.”
Publishing less to give readers more
“When something happens, we write a story. When something else happens, we write a new story. News event? New story! New developments? New story! New responses? New story!”
Publishers seek ad dollar alternatives
“Next year, I predict many more publishers will push to establish business models with which, as one executive at a national publication recently put it during my research for the Tow Center’s Platforms and Publishers project, ‘you can kind of give the finger to the platforms.'”