HOME
          
LATEST STORY
How The Forward, 118 years old, is remaking itself as the American Jewish community changes
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Nov. 12, 2008, 10:07 a.m.

Morning Links: November 12, 2008

— Blog company Six Apart announces layoffs. But interestingly, they repeat the argument I mentioned in my talk with Jeff Howe: that a declining economy is good for innovations in new media:

We’ve been reminded lately that blogging was born out of the last recession in 2001-2002, and that during tough economic times creative voices look to powerful, cost-effective ways to connect and communicate with the world around them.

— Two Connecticut towns may be test cases for a newspaperless future come January 12. A reporter there, Steve Collins, is griefblogging. After acknowledging “I know some are disappointed about its inability to cover everything anymore or even to get copies delivered properly”:

A city without a newspaper lacks an identity because it doesn’t have a way to talk to itself. It can’t communicate beyond the narrow bounds of personal ties. It becomes a far lesser place. Don’t believe me? Go ask the people in a city that doesn’t have a paper.

— A liveblog from a “changing media landscape” discussion at Columbia.

— Battle of the titans: Ron Rosenbaum tries to take down Jeff Jarvis. (“He’s now visibly running for New Media Pontificator in Chief. He began treating his own thoughts as profound and epigrammatic, PowerPoint-paradoxical, new-media-mystical.”) Grab some popcorn and enjoy the show — it’s likely to be one of those classic media clashes that leaves you feeling a little less for both. (Update: Jarvis responds, and I think fairly. I’m a big Rosenbaum fan, but he was reaching.)

POSTED     Nov. 12, 2008, 10:07 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
How The Forward, 118 years old, is remaking itself as the American Jewish community changes
The newspaper, first published in Yiddish, is facing all the familiar pressures of print, combined with a shifting base of potential readers.
Newsonomics: Are local newspapers the taxi cabs of the Uber age?
Local newspapers still act as if they’re monopolies — despite all the new players eating away at their audiences’ attention. Is there room to adapt?
The Dallas Morning News is building data (and sources) through its new Rolodex tool
The open-source tool lets reporters contribute contacts to a centralized newsroom collection of sources — but it can also be used to build larger reader-facing data products.
What to read next
2401
tweets
The Economist’s Tom Standage on digital strategy and the limits of a model based on advertising
“The Economist has taken the view that advertising is nice, and we’ll certainly take money where we can get it, but we’re pretty much expecting it to go away.”
889A wave of distributed content is coming — will publishers sink or swim?
Instead of just publishing to their own websites, news organizations are being asked to publish directly to platforms they don’t control. Is the hunt for readers enough to justify losing some independence?
448This is my next step: How The Verge wants to grow beyond tech blogging
“We want to use technology as a way to define pop culture, in the way Rolling Stone used music and Wired used the early Internet.”
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Crosscut
InvestigateWest
Slate
St. Louis Beacon
Reuters
Bureau of Investigative Journalism
Ushahidi
Franklin Center
McClatchy
Mashable
Google
Instapaper