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Nieman Journalism Lab
Pushing to the future of journalism — A project of the Nieman Foundation at Harvard

My future-of-journalism top 10

The people at blog vendor Six Apart asked me to make a list of the top 10 blogs about the future of journalism. In alphabetical order:

Adrian Monck, the head of a UK journalism school and a smart commentator, particularly on the more academic/philosophy-of-journalism side;

BuzzMachine, Ron Rosenbaum’s favorite blog;

Content Bridges, the blog of Ken Doctor, for my money the smartest analyst of the business side of the business;

Eat Sleep Publish, by Jason Preston, a smart advocate for new thinking and opponent of curmudgeons;

Journerdism, by Will Sullivan, the best aggregator of forward-looking links;

Mathew Ingram, a perceptive Canadian (and one always needs perceptive Canadians);

MediaShift, the Knight-funded and PBS-hosted mini-think-tank, admirably hosted by Mark Glaser;

The Nieman Journalism Lab, which must be a typo;

Notes from a Teacher, another perceptive Canadian, Mark Hamilton, another great aggregator;

Teaching Online Journalism, by Mindy McAdams, the preeminent evangelist for multimedia journalism.

Apologies to those who just missed the cut. (And yes, Friendly Blogger, you were No. 11.)

                                   
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  • http://www.journerdism.com Will Sullivan

    Wow, thanks for the shout out, Josh! I look forward to aggregating more forward-thinking links your direction. :)

  • Mathew Ingram

    Thanks a lot, Josh — happy to do my part to hold up the “perceptive Canadian” end of things :-)

  • http://globalmojo.org stephen quinn

    The world offers many versions of reality. Many blogs that offer good advice on the future of journalism are available beyond the borders of North America. Why do 8 of the so-called top 10 come from the US? This myopia – this inability to look beyond the borders of the continent – is an indication of part of the problem with America’s media.

  • http://www.niemanlab.org/ Joshua Benton

    Hi Stephen: How about offering up some non-U.S. suggestions then?

  • Pingback: Stephen Quinn’s blog » Blog Archive » Smart bloggers outside North America