Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Dec. 12, 2008, 5:19 p.m.

Detroit’s plan: Risks, but rewards?

The Wall Street Journal (subscribers only) comes closer to confirming the Detroit newspapers will stop home delivery most days of the week:

The publisher hasn’t made a final decision, said this person, but the leading scenario set to be unveiled Tuesday would call for the Free Press and its partner paper, the Detroit News, to end home delivery on all but the most lucrative days — Thursday, Friday and Sunday. On the other days, the publisher would sell single copies of an abbreviated print edition at newsstands and direct readers to the papers’ expanded digital editions.

I’ve mentioned that I think this is a worthy response to the current crisis: Certainly nothing you’d want to do in a perfect situation, but a way to redirect cuts from the newsroom to production costs.

I had planned to contrast Martin Langeveld’s positive take with Alan Mutter’s pessimistic one. Two very smart guys, disagreeing on a plan of action a lot of papers are going to take in the next few months. But now I see that Martin’s summed up both sides — plus a few others — in a post of his own. Make that your weekend reading.

POSTED     Dec. 12, 2008, 5:19 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
 
Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
More Facebook Watch news shows are on the way — but is the effort worth it for all local publishers?
There’s a big difference between the number of people who worry about fake news and who say they’ve actually seen it
Plus: Facebook looks to hire “news credibility specialists,” and Reuters tries to figure out if highly partisan sites are gaining traction in and outside the U.S. (it looks as if they’re not).
After years of growth, the use of social media for news is falling across the world
But messaging apps are picking up the slack, the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism finds in its 2018 Digital News Report.