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Slate, now 20 years old, reflects on the value of taking the long view and not chasing digital media trends
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Jan. 23, 2009, 8:32 a.m.

Buy a newspaper or save a newspaper: Your choice.

facebookpaperWhat’s the better way to save the newspaper business?

Sign a pledge on Facebook to buy a newspaper on February 2nd?

Or work from within to show journalists how to use Facebook (or MySpace or Twitter or Google or just how and why to link) to advance journalism beyond the old business of ink on paper?

The first may briefly make you feel good about yourself, but the second just might change you, whether you’re a journalist or not.

Gina Chen is a journalist — a reporter and mom-blogger who decided that she’d heard enough about how slowly the newspaper business was changing. So she did something about it. She started a blog, called Save the Media, that is short on pontification and long on practical advice that any journalist can put to immediate use.

She’s been posting since late last year and has shown no sign yet that she’s running short on ideas.

Any working journalist that hasn’t yet bookmarked Chen’s blog might want to take a moment and do so now.

POSTED     Jan. 23, 2009, 8:32 a.m.
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