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Newsonomics: The Daily’s Michael Barbaro on becoming a personality, learning to focus, and Maggie Haberman’s singing
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Jan. 12, 2009, 1:29 a.m.

Morning Links: January 12, 2009

— Seth Godin says now’s a great time to start a newspaper. (Or, more accurately, an email news…something.) “It will cost you nothing. It will become your gift to the community. And it will be a long lasting asset that belongs to you, not to the competition.” And he’s right — so long as your goals are, as he suggests, the promotion of an established local business, not the creation of what would be traditionally called a “news organization,” the kind with salaries and such. But plenty of newspapers have been published for the promotion or self-aggrandizement of their owner, so this would not be without precedent.

— Doug Fisher has some interesting thoughts on corrections in an Internet world:

[News organizations should start] updating newsroom work flows and mindsets so that a correction is generally not seen as a traumatic thing but a natural outcome of the evolving way we are publishing online (keeping in mind that some will be more severe and may require management intervention).

— Steve Bowbrick argues the BBC should encourage staff to contribute to Wikipedia. Recall last month’s news that a scientific journal was requiring its authors to pen Wikipedia entries to go with their new research — one more and it’s a trend! For local news organizations, that push might be better directed toward creating the ultimate local wiki, covering the people, places, and issues that aren’t big enough to find their way into Wikipedia. Throw some ad space on there and you’ve got a long-lasting piece of content that Google will love to send searchers to.

POSTED     Jan. 12, 2009, 1:29 a.m.
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