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Jan. 28, 2009, 7:15 a.m.

Morning Links: January 28, 2009

— Mark Briggs asks: What’s your video SEO strategy? (That is, how are making sure Google and other search engines are sending traffic to your videos?) He points to this study by a consulting company on the issue.

Google can’t (yet!) understand all the words spoken in your videos, so even if your subject screams “Chicken McNugget” throughout a video, no one Googling for those tasty white-meat nuggets will come across it without a little search-engine optimization help. This is one reason (among many) we publish transcripts of our videos whenever we produce a new one — Google can read transcripts just fine.

— The New York Times opens up an API for its weekly bestseller book lists. Looks interesting, but it’s a shame they don’t seem to be opening up any of the data underlying the list — that is, the sales-data secret sauce that is used to determine who’s No. 1 and who’s No. 7. That would be a fun data set to play around with.

— Bill Cunningham is the Times’ street-fashion photographer, and here is his audio slideshow from inauguration day. I link not because of the photography, but because of how blogger Jason Kottke linked to it:

Be sure to listen to Cunningham’s wonderful narration; he even gets choked up when describing the moment of Obama’s swearing-in. I wish all journalism were this professionally personal (if that makes any sense).

Emphasis all mine.

POSTED     Jan. 28, 2009, 7:15 a.m.
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