Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The New York Times’ new Slack 2016 election bot sends readers’ questions straight to the newsroom
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 28, 2009, 7:15 a.m.

Morning Links: January 28, 2009

— Mark Briggs asks: What’s your video SEO strategy? (That is, how are making sure Google and other search engines are sending traffic to your videos?) He points to this study by a consulting company on the issue.

Google can’t (yet!) understand all the words spoken in your videos, so even if your subject screams “Chicken McNugget” throughout a video, no one Googling for those tasty white-meat nuggets will come across it without a little search-engine optimization help. This is one reason (among many) we publish transcripts of our videos whenever we produce a new one — Google can read transcripts just fine.

— The New York Times opens up an API for its weekly bestseller book lists. Looks interesting, but it’s a shame they don’t seem to be opening up any of the data underlying the list — that is, the sales-data secret sauce that is used to determine who’s No. 1 and who’s No. 7. That would be a fun data set to play around with.

— Bill Cunningham is the Times’ street-fashion photographer, and here is his audio slideshow from inauguration day. I link not because of the photography, but because of how blogger Jason Kottke linked to it:

Be sure to listen to Cunningham’s wonderful narration; he even gets choked up when describing the moment of Obama’s swearing-in. I wish all journalism were this professionally personal (if that makes any sense).

Emphasis all mine.

POSTED     Jan. 28, 2009, 7:15 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
The New York Times’ new Slack 2016 election bot sends readers’ questions straight to the newsroom
“Instead of asking you to come to us and be part of this massive room of people shouting over each other, you can bring us to you, and have us be, essentially, one more person in your conversation.”
The Conversation expands across the U.S., freshly funded by universities and foundations
The news site that uses academics as reporters and journalists as editors now boasts 19 paying member universities and is opening up posts in Atlanta (and maybe in the Bay Area).
A Boston public radio station is redesigning its site to make audio “a first-class citizen online”
But: “I’ve tried to be really disciplined about not calling this process just a redesign,” WBUR’s executive editor for digital Tiffany Campbell said. “We’ve built a brand new platform.”
What to read next
0
tweets
Newsonomics: Setting the news table for 2016
The news business hopes it won’t end up one sandwich short of a picnic as the new year’s big trends unfold.
0The sun never sets on The Times: How and why the British paper built its new weekly international app
“We’re pursuing the idea of editions everywhere. An edition is something that can be finished. When you’ve read it, you feel up-to-date; you’ve been told what you need to know for the day or the week.”
0Hot Pod: Is the next front in podcast innovation hardware?
Plus, 21st Century Fox invests in a new podcast network, and some thoughts on the second season of Serial.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Fuego is our heat-seeking Twitter bot, tracking the links the future-of-journalism crowd is talking about most on Twitter.
Here are a few of the top links Fuego’s currently watching.   Get the full Fuego ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
The Miami Herald
Bureau of Investigative Journalism
NBCNews.com
Davis Wiki
The Fiscal Times
American Independent News Network
The Daily Show
Plaza Pública
PBS
The UpTake
Austin American-Statesman
Next Door Media