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March 25, 2009, 6:24 p.m.

Lots of great future-of-news pieces in the new issue of Nieman Reports

As we mentioned previously, it’s time for a new issue of Nieman Reports, our sister quarterly here at the Nieman Foundation. Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve given you previews of two of its stories: Joel Kramer on lessons from running MinnPost and Margaret Wolf Freivogel on her startup, the St. Louis Beacon.

The entire issue is now online, so you can check through the table of contents to see more great pieces. Here are links to the ones with topics that most directly deal with online journalism and the startup world:

local online investigative reporting, by Andrew Donohue and Scott Lewis of Voice of San Diego;

lessons from Spot.us, by Alexis Madrigal;

using tech in watchdog journalism, by Bill Allison of the Sunlight Foundation;

data analysis and “computational journalism”, by friend-of-the-Lab Jay Hamilton;

collaborations with universities on reporting, by Walter Robinson;

a conversation on multimedia, with Brian Storm;

doing video journalism online, by Nick Penniman;

using social media in reporting, by Julia Luscher Thompson;

using the web for big projects, by my former colleague Maud Beelman;

using multimedia in a crime story, by Christine Young;

— and corrections, witty and otherwise, by Craig Silverman.

POSTED     March 25, 2009, 6:24 p.m.
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