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How The Forward, 118 years old, is remaking itself as the American Jewish community changes
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April 16, 2009, 1:49 p.m.

Mine. Er, Yours. Or Some Guy’s.

A brief update on Mine, the Time Inc. magazine customization effort I wrote about yesterday where you pick the mags whose old articles you’d like repackaged into a custom advertising vehicle for Lexus.

In the comments of that post, a woman named lindadcb writes:

I received a copy of “Mine” and it did not contain the titles I selected – so it’s not really ‘mine’?

I was confused by the entire thing

Perhaps she errantly received a copy of That Guy Down the Street’s? But seriously, it does appear there were some problems with Time Inc.’s customization engine. Our own Zach Seward got his copy in the mail yesterday and got this email a few hours later:

So apparently some Mine readers are getting apologies that Time Inc. screwed up their customization. (Actually, Zach reports, they got his magazine choices right. He picked the same ones that I did, except subbing in Time for InStyle. And his Lexus ad promoted the vehicle’s usefulness in transporting luggage, not “vintage wine,” as mine did. I guess Time readers don’t drink wine. Or something.)

Does the mention of a new sixth issue of Mine mean this will have a life beyond just being a Lexus promotional trial?

POSTED     April 16, 2009, 1:49 p.m.
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