Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Americans don’t really like the media much — unless it’s their go-to news outlets you’re asking about
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
June 1, 2009, 9:12 p.m.

The question of the week…

is asked by the ever thought-provoking Gina Chen of Save the Media:

Imagine if a newspaper’s Web site didn’t look like a news Web site at all. Instead, when you entered the site, you faced a question: What do you want to do? (I’m picturing it almost like Facebook’s “What’s on Your Mind?”)

You could pick from a pull-down  list of choices — find out the weather, read the top story, find the movie reviews, do a crossword puzzle, post a video game review, view today’s front page.

You’d also be able to type in what you wanted if none of the options met your needs. And you could bypass this search option, and navigate the site yourself if you desired. It would be like a typical news Web site search feature, but on steroids.

Chen suggests this could be how news sites move from hyperlocal to “hyperinterest.”  Check it out.

POSTED     June 1, 2009, 9:12 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 35,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Americans don’t really like the media much — unless it’s their go-to news outlets you’re asking about
Just 24 percent of Americans said they regard “the news media” as “moral,” but that number jumps to 53 percent for the media they consume often.
How The Washington Post plans to use Talk, The Coral Project’s new commenting platform
“By outlining and making clear what your expectations are for the space, you’re already creating a greater likelihood of success.”
“Complementary, not competitive”: Philly’s NBC 10 is using web exclusives to find new viewers
“Storytelling is a differentiator. I wish we did more of it on the air, but since we don’t, we’re doing it in digital.