Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
For Western news companies looking to India, partnering with local publishers is a path in
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
June 1, 2009, 9:12 p.m.

The question of the week…

is asked by the ever thought-provoking Gina Chen of Save the Media:

Imagine if a newspaper’s Web site didn’t look like a news Web site at all. Instead, when you entered the site, you faced a question: What do you want to do? (I’m picturing it almost like Facebook’s “What’s on Your Mind?”)

You could pick from a pull-down  list of choices — find out the weather, read the top story, find the movie reviews, do a crossword puzzle, post a video game review, view today’s front page.

You’d also be able to type in what you wanted if none of the options met your needs. And you could bypass this search option, and navigate the site yourself if you desired. It would be like a typical news Web site search feature, but on steroids.

Chen suggests this could be how news sites move from hyperlocal to “hyperinterest.”  Check it out.

POSTED     June 1, 2009, 9:12 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
For Western news companies looking to India, partnering with local publishers is a path in
Vice is only the latest American or British publisher to seek out an Indian partner — in its case the Times Group — for reasons that combine local knowledge and legal restrictions.
Hot Pod: Are too many people skipping the ads in podcasts?
Plus: Using TV’s playbook to pitch podcasts to advertisers, moving from magazines into audio, and a Slack experiment aims to make Gimlet’s core listeners feel engaged.
The New York Times is trying to narrow the distance between reporters and analytics data
It’s building on its in-house analytics dashboard, Stela, with the goal of making audience engagement data easy to find, simple to understand, and even fun to use.