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Dec. 17, 2010, 1:30 p.m.

Accountability journalism and the law: An international perspective on prosecuting the whistleblowers

If you weren’t able to attend the secrecy and journalism conference here at the Nieman Foundation on Thursday we’ve got good news: You can see it all in video recaps of the day. We’ve already posted the morning keynote from the AP’s Kathleen Carroll, and here’s the first panel discussion: “Prosecuted, Banned, Blamed: Reporters Push Boundaries as a Voice of Public Accountability.”

In light of the news that U.S. authorities are contemplating whether criminal charges can be brought against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, the assembled panel of current and former Nieman Fellows talk about the real threat of prosecution that journalists often face abroad. The panel features Stefan Candea, Rob Rose, Alejandra Matus, and Kevin Doyle offering perspectives on the situation for journalists in Romania, South Africa, Chile and Cambodia. We’ve also included the archived liveblog of the discussion from inside the room and online.

POSTED     Dec. 17, 2010, 1:30 p.m.
PART OF A SERIES     Secrecy and Journalism
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