Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
As government records move from paper to email to channels like Slack, how should FOIA keep up?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Sept. 22, 2011, noon

From Nieman Reports: What goes unsaid about the dynamics of race in the newsroom

Do minority journalists face a different standard for reporting on race than their white colleagues?

Editor’s Note: Our sister publication Nieman Reports is out with their Fall 2011 issue, “Cold Case Reporting,” which focuses on process of revisiting old investigations to tell new stories. Over the next few days, we’ll highlight a few stories from the issue — but go read the whole thing. In this piece, Amy Alexander writes about the dynamics of race and writing about minorities in the newsroom.

This past summer a journalism controversy rooted in America’s troubled racial history erupted on the web. A young, white female reporter, Mac McClelland, wrote for Good magazine about brief stints she’d spent covering Haiti for Mother Jones. She described how she dealt with the emotional fallout that resulted in a form of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after she witnessed Haitians living in dire poverty and experiencing violence. To cope in the aftermath, she had developed something of an obsession with “violent sex.”

The details McClelland shared in her June story were lurid and poignant: she described being so traumatized by the guns and by “gang-raping monsters who prowl the flimsy encampments of the earthquake homeless” that she began “fantasizing” about having sex at gunpoint. When she returned to the United States, McClelland wrote, she talked a former boyfriend into having sex with her in a way that would be “rougher” than anything she had ever experienced.

Her essay blazed a quick, hot path through the blogosphere. Soon a multiracial coalition of some 36 women scholars, activists and journalists, including Slate blogger Marjorie Valbrun and New York Times correspondent Ginger Thompson, both of whom spent many years covering Haiti, sent an open letter to McClelland’s editors at Good. On July 1, the website Jezebel, whose audience is largely young women, published this letter. In it, the letter’s authors said that they respected “the heart” of McClelland’s story about her trauma, but they objected to her portrayal of Haiti as what they called “a heart-of-darkness dystopia.”

Keep reading at Nieman Reports »

POSTED     Sept. 22, 2011, noon
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
As government records move from paper to email to channels like Slack, how should FOIA keep up?
“I have a love-hate relationship with FOIA.”
Om mani padme hum: The New York Times wants to help you meditate (and run and lose weight and just feel good)
With increasingly product-driven thinking, the Times’ Well is breaking out of the news cycle — through VR, evergreen newsletters, and how-to guides — in an attempt to connect more deeply with readers.
For many legacy news organizations in Europe, digital disruption comes with new ideas but few answers
A new Reuters Institute report reaffirms familiar trendlines in digital publishing: “People are using mobile more and more, but we are not yet getting the revenue out of it that we would like to get.”