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With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
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March 26, 2012, 4:31 p.m.
LINK: gothamist.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   March 26, 2012

Police departments are still figuring out how to deal with local blogs and news sites that want press passes — the key to getting past police lines in many jurisdictions. After an epic struggle, NYC blog Gothamist finally has one. Congrats to Jake Dobkin, Jen Chung, & Co. They describe a quasi-orwellian process, with a little humor leavened in:

“I was angry about having to spend so many hours preparing the exhibits and so much money on legal fees for a hearing I expected to lose,” Jake recalls. “I expressed this resentment by wearing blue socks with dinosaurs on them.”

Dobkin has written a guide for those navigating the process in New York. We wrote back in 2009 about the NYPD’s issues defining who’s press-pass worthy.

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