Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
As podcasts grow, the podcast freelance economy takes shape
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
March 8, 2012, 9:45 a.m.
Corey Ford

PRX hires Silicon Valley journopreneur Corey Ford to run the Public Media Accelerator

Ford worried that public media was not changing, so he left it for Silicon Valley; now he’s bringing an entrepreneurial spirit back to his roots.

Corey Ford

Corey Ford, a former Frontline documentarian who left public media to reinvent it in Silicon Valley, has been named director of the Public Media Accelerator, a $2.5 million incubator launched by PRX and funded by the Knight Foundation.

Ford, 34, produced 17 films in six years at Frontline, sharing in duPont and Emmy awards, before quitting to earn his MBA at Stanford and eventually become a venture capitalist.

Public Media Accelerator logo

“I had a tremendous career in public television, but for me, I thought…Media is changing so dramatically. Business models are changing so dramatically. This is not a growth industry. We’re not changing at all,” Ford told me.

“That’s when I started thinking, I want to get out to Silicon Valley, and I want to learn more about how entrepreneurship and innovation work.”

That kind of thinking is very much in line with the PRX ethos: We love public media, but we wish it could be so much more.

“It’s almost like he was dreamt up in our laboratory,” said Jake Shapiro, the executive director. “He shares a lot of DNA with PRX.”

The idea for Public Media Accelerator is built on Y Combinator and TechStars. Entrepreneurs and engineers compete for seed money and the chance to work heads-down on a new project for 12-week stints. The resulting work is presented to high-rolling investors for the opportunity to build a business. Applications open this summer.

“You may or may not save the current institutions, but you can have the mission of journalism at the core of what you do.”

While at Stanford, Ford discovered the Institute of Design, the d.School, and became a disciple of design thinking, the multidisciplinary, blank-slate approach to problem-solving.

After finishing the program he became a teacher, leading an experiment to “redesign journalism” in 2009 that helped inform Stanford’s revamped, project-focused Knight fellowships. Ford’s students included Burt Herman, co-founder of Storify and founder of Hacks/Hackers, and Andrew Haeg, co-founder of APM’s Public Insight Network.

Ford was then recruited to join a new venture-capital firm for Google’s Eric Schmidt, Innovation Endeavors, where he created a paid nine-month entrepreneurship program not unlike the Public Media Accelerator’s. After a year building that program from scratch, Ford is taking on the new role at PRX beginning April 1, bringing his career full circle.

Ford stresses the parameters are still being worked out. “Like any good design thinker,” he said, “I need to start with empathy and need-finding and low-res prototyping before jumping to ‘This is the solution.'”

Ford will stay put in Palo Alto, which is not what PRX originally had in mind. Shapiro had hoped to give the accelerator a strong Boston/Cambridge identity. “My fantasy is everyone’s working elbow to elbow,” Shapiro told me, but in reality PRX’s own staff is spread across the country. Ford said he will have to figure out whether the accelerator is “a place or a distributed thing,” how much value physical space has in the digital world.

Public media has a problem attracting hungry 20-something tech stars.

This is all very new for public media, for journalism in general. The industry has a little bit of an image problem when it comes to attracting tech talent. Just this week, Sarah Cohen at Duke’s new Reporters’ Lab said it best: “Bright engineers tend not to be interested in solving today’s problems but future problems.”

For a lot of hungry 20-something tech stars, journalism might seem like today’s problem.

“Entrepreneurs come from all different walks of life — technologists, designers, business people, media people, storytellers who are passionate about this mission,” Ford said. “Yes, the biggest talent war is going in Silicon Valley right now, as we speak, but I’ve learned from personal experience that if you set up something that really celebrates the entrepreneur, and gives them a chance to pursue their passion and treats them…like entrepreneurs, you can attract amazing talent.”

Ford continued: “It’s not about looking toward the past. It’s more about reimagining the future…You may or may not save the current institutions, but you can have the mission of public media and journalism at the core of what you do.”

Disclosure: The Knight Foundation is also a financial supporter of the Nieman Journalism Lab. The photo of Corey Ford is provided as a courtesy of the Stanford Institute of Design.

POSTED     March 8, 2012, 9:45 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
As podcasts grow, the podcast freelance economy takes shape
AIR has come up with suggested rates of compensation for those who do freelance work for podcasts, where a new injection of for-profit companies is complicating the math of public media.
A program in New Jersey is trying to get people to care about local news through community organizing
Free Press’ News Voices: New Jersey is meant to be “community-driven as opposed to being newsroom-driven.”
Scratch Magazine was profitable, but it’s still shutting down — here’s what its founder learned
Scratch Magazine toed the line between “servicey and intellectual,” cofounder Manjula Martin says. That was one reason the paywalled site didn’t make much money.
What to read next
2843
tweets
A blow for mobile advertising: The next version of Safari will let users block ads on iPhones and iPads
Think making money on mobile advertising is hard now? Think how much more difficult it will be with a significant share of your audience is blocking all your ads — all with a simple download from the App Store.
1763For news organizations, this was the most important set of Apple announcements in years
A new Flipboard-clone with massive potential reach, R.I.P. Newsstand, and news stories embedded deeper inside iOS — it was a big day for news on iPhones and iPads.
828Newsonomics: 10 numbers that define the news business today
From video to social, from mobile to paywalls — these data points help define where we are in the “future of news” today, like it or not.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
The Daily Telegraph
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
The Nation
Sacramento Press
Seattle PostGlobe
SeeClickFix
Quartz
Sports Illustrated
Gawker Media
NBCNews.com
Salon
The Awl