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April 2, 2012, 8:02 p.m.
LINK: creativecommons.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   April 2, 2012

CC’s Diane Peters runs through some of the updates. Most of interest to me is something that isn’t updated: the definition of what constitutes “noncommercial” use of a Creative Commons work. (Something we’ve written about before.)

As for NonCommercial, more discussion is necessary if any of the current proposals or arguments for changing that definition are to be advanced. Consequently, we have left the definition unchanged in this first draft. On both of these issues, look for prompts from us on the license discussion list and this blog, and please contribute your voice to the discussion.

Specifically:

While many community members have expressed concern about the ambiguity of the license definition, we do not believe there is a sufficiently clear or compelling alternative presented yet meriting a change. We look forward to receiving more input about the definition of NC and related proposals during this public comment period.

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