Nieman Foundation at Harvard
Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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May 3, 2012, 9:43 a.m.
Business Models
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 3, 2012

Horace runs the Critical Path podcast and Asymco, a blog/consultancy that focuses on digital business disruption through the lens of mobile. (They’re both pretty great — lots to learn for media biz-side folks.) In this week’s Critical Path, he talks with Harvard Business School legend Clay Christenson, Horace’s old prof and the driving force behind modern disruption theory.

Horace interviews his teacher Clay Christensen to discuss his new book, How Will You Measure Your Life. We discuss some of the concepts of learning, jobs to be done and approaches to self-disruption. We also cover what Clay is working on next in his writing and research. Lastly, we talk about what Apple should worry about in its disruptive journey.

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Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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