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Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
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May 29, 2012, 10:17 a.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: timeoutchicago.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 29, 2012

Robert Feder, media columnist for Time Out Chicago, isn’t a big fan of the Tribune’s outsourcing of its hyperlocal sections to Journatic.

I used to look forward to receiving TribLocal, the weekly hyperlocal news insert in my Chicago Tribune. But now it’s become a worthless piece of garbage…

In its first three weeks, I’ve seen nothing in this new rag but press releases, computer-generated junk and, of course, ads. Major news stories in my suburb are completely ignored. What passes for a police blotter is a long list of street names, one- or two-word descriptions, and a time and date. (This is what you get when you have a staff of four people overseeing 22 publications and 89 websites.)

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