Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales launches Wikitribune, a large-scale attempt to combat fake news
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 7, 2012, 10:21 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: jonsteinberg.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 7, 2012

That’s Buzzfeed’s claim, from founder Jonah Peretti as echoed here by Buzzfeed president Jon Steinberg. The argument is that we like to intermingle our streams of information — to be talking about the news one minute, philosophy the next, our last meal the next.

It’s why BuzzFeed can tangle with the White House, on the same day as having the great memey post 23 Reasons Why May Is Going To Be The Best Month Ever. We think people want a mix of all different types of social content, and we think an intermingling, organized by social, is what makes the most sense in today’s world. And the Facebook newsfeed and the Twitter feed, prove that in the social era you consume content like you sit at the Paris Cafe…

The newsfeed changes everything — it’s multifaceted, social, and fast — and that’s why social publishing is so different from traditional publishing. In fact, it resembles the Paris cafe more than it does the newspapers we grew up with.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 35,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales launches Wikitribune, a large-scale attempt to combat fake news
The crowd-funded news platform aims to combat fake news by combining professional journalism with volunteer fact checking: “news by the people and for the people.”
What’s holding back virtual reality news? Slow tech adoption, monetization, and yes, dull content
“I’m afraid that more and more people in news organizations use 360 for stories that are not interesting. Bad content will keep people away from watching it.”
The New York Times brings its (even briefer) morning briefings to Snapchat Discover
Staffers insist the Times won’t pander to its Discover audience, but the morning briefing is being reenvisioned as a quick 300-word scan.