Nieman Foundation at Harvard
Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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May 3, 2012, 1:31 p.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 3, 2012

It’s an interesting move for the first news outlet to be completely designed for a specific device, the iPad. We wrote last month about Bloomberg Businessweek’s similar iPad-to-iPhone move; they follow a line of news aggregators like Flipboard who’ve made the same jump.

For as much as magazines and other news outlets have fallen in love with the iPad as a content vehicle, it’s worth remembering there are a ton more iPhones in the world. (Last quarter: 35.1 million iPhones sold; 11.8 million iPads sold.) And particularly for a daily “newspaper,” it makes sense to be available on the devices we carry around with us all day long.

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Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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