Nieman Foundation at Harvard
If the Philadelphia newspapers wanted to convert to nonprofits, what would stand in their way?
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May 2, 2012, 11:42 p.m.
Audience & Social
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 2, 2012

Founder Josh Marshall explains why he’s been dissatisfied with various third-party solutions (their current is Livefyre) and why, unlike Nick Denton, he doesn’t want to invest development resources into Building The Perfect Commenting System.

In addition to spending lots of time and money supporting commenting systems that don’t work well — the worst of both worlds — we also spend a ton of time dealing with trolls, spammers and miscellaneous anti-social behavior in the comments. And since our staff is heavily weighted to reporters and editors, it’s the reporters and editors who in most cases have to do that work. And that doesn’t make sense. I want them breaking news not trying to keep flyboy7456 from screaming obscenities in some comment thread.

He answers the we-need-anonymity argument by asking tipsters to tip elsewhere (i.e., through the ageless email address). Ironically enough, there’s no space for comments on Josh’s post, so some TPM commenters are opting to complain over here.

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