HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The newsonomics of MLB’s pioneering mobile experience
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
June 19, 2012, 11 a.m.
Aggregation & Discovery

Watchup wants to be a “Hulu for news junkies” on your iPad

Knight News Challenge winner Watchup aggregates videos from YouTube for a new iPad app that lets users customize their own mini-newscasts.

Watch-whenever-you-want Family Guy reruns are great — but have you ever wished there was a Hulu for the news? The team behind Knight News Challenge winner Watchup hopes so.

Watchup is an iPad app that lets users curate their own newscasts. Pick 10 stories from 10 channels, then lean back with your morning coffee and watch as the stories roll past without user intervention. Channels cover topics like finance, technology, breaking news, business, and other news categories. The app comes preloaded with 10 channels, but users will be able to customize from a list of about 40 total.

CEO Adriano Farano says his goal is to make it easy for news junkies to catch up with video news at peak iPad use times, in the morning and evening, without having to jump back and forth between different apps or websites. Essentially, the goal is to have quality video find the consumer rather than making users seek it out in multiple places. Here’s a quick demo from the Watchup website:

So where do these quality videos come from? Watchup is working on lining up news partners, but at launch they’re relying mainly on the vast video seas of YouTube, where lots of newsrooms are already posting their content. “We basically have The Wall Street Journal, CNN, ABC, PBS — all the major news channels are there,” Farano told me. “We are talking to some publishers whose content is not available through YouTube for some reason, and usually they’re extremely interested to partner with us. The initial lineup will be mainly from YouTube.”

Watchup aims to be a solution for people who feel “lost” amid the endless stream of videos on YouTube, and want a simpler experience. (“It’s so easy that even your grandmother can get it,” Farano says.) Users can develop a single playlist in one place for a watching experience that’s more personalized than TV and more “lean back” than clicking around online. “The whole experience is about bringing down the discovery point to just a few seconds,” he said.

Farano says Watchup plans to generate revenue from pre-roll ads that will air before videos, and the plan is to give news organizations a cut. The trick will be to create an interface that’s appealing enough to users that they’ll abandon engrained habits and be willing to watch ads that they might otherwise be able to avoid. Farano argues it’s also an ideal solution for news organizations like The Wall Street Journal that find they can’t produce enough video to meet advertising demand.

“You are selling out your inventory,” Farano said. “You have a problem. You have advertisers but you don’t have enough to sell them, so the way we come into the game is we say, ‘Hey, we are a Hulu for news junkies…Give us your ads and we share the revenue.”

Watchup’s Knight News Challenge funding will come as a venture capital investment instead of as a grant; the amount of the funding was not disclosed.

POSTED     June 19, 2012, 11 a.m.
SEE MORE ON Aggregation & Discovery
PART OF A SERIES     Knight News Challenge 2012
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
The newsonomics of MLB’s pioneering mobile experience
Running a sports league and running a news operation aren’t the same thing. But there are lessons to be learned from baseball’s success in navigating mobile.
Why The New York Times built a tool for crowdsourced time travel
Madison, a new tool that asks readers to help identify ads in the Times archives, is part of a new open source platform for crowdsourcing built by the company’s R&D Lab.
Opening up the archives: JSTOR wants to tie a library to the news
Its new site JSTOR Daily highlights interesting research and offers background and context on current events.
What to read next
1020
tweets
The newsonomics of the millennial moment
The new wave of news startups is aiming at a younger audience. But do legacy media companies have a chance at earning their attention?
803A mixed bag on apps: What The New York Times learned with NYT Opinion and NYT Now
The two apps were part of the paper’s plan to increase digital subscribers through smaller, targeted offerings. Now, with staff cutbacks on the way, one app is being shuttered and the other is being adjusted.
413The new Vox daily email, explained
The company’s newsletter, Vox Sentences, enters an increasingly crowded inbox. Can concise writing and smart aggregation on the day’s news help expand their audience?
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Al Jazeera
Fox News
New York
Media Consortium
PolitiFact
Gotham Gazette
Gawker Media
Chicago News Cooperative
Davis Wiki
El País
Newsmax
Center for Public Integrity