Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Slate, now 20 years old, reflects on the value of taking the long view and not chasing digital media trends
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
July 11, 2012, 11:09 a.m.
LINK: jxpaton.wordpress.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   July 11, 2012

The Journal-Register/Digital First chief dings Advance for poor communications and letting top talent go, but things too much of the criticism of the New Orleans Times-Picayune’s moves are just change aversion:

Imagine [owners’] surprise when community leaders — politicians, musicians, restaurant owners — demand the owners sell their business to them (for a song surely, it’s a dying business after all) because they want to stick with the old dying business. Imagine their surprise when their industry colleagues and critics lambaste them for changing when change is what is needed.

As for me, the owners are doing what they think right. Could they do it better? I think they could do it a lot better but they are attempting to dramatically change their business. And it is a change largely directed at a future that focuses on the new line of business and less on the old. Importantly, they remain committed to their core business and mission with what resources they have.

So I support them because their industry is my industry and it will not survive without dramatic, difficult and bloody change. And like them I am willing to do what it takes to make our businesses survive.

Worth noting: In Paton’s role running MediaNews, Paton already runs a newspaper that publishes less than daily.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Slate, now 20 years old, reflects on the value of taking the long view and not chasing digital media trends
“One of the things you’ve seen across the marketplace for the last five years is a lot of companies are chasing the same kind of traffic from the same social distribution mechanisms…It’s not a recipe for producing a distinctive media brand.”
How the new director of Philly’s Institute for Journalism in New Media is approaching his job
Longtime media consultant Jim Friedlich discusses his vision for a sustainable metro newspaper.
A new audio startup focuses on tailoring a playlist of short form stories that fit into a listener’s day
60dB, named for the volume at which a human speaks and founded by a former Planet Money reporter and two others with backgrounds at Netflix, is being teased as a “service for high-quality, short-form stories.”