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Aug. 16, 2012, 5:57 p.m.

Come have a drink with Nieman Lab Monday

Boston-area residents, it’s the return of the Nieman Lab happy hour, at The Field in Central Square.

Astronomically speaking, there’s still more than a month left of summer. But especially for those of us who work at, attend, or send kids to schools, summer’s bound at least as much by academic calendars as the tilt of Earth’s axis. That means time is short, and that means that it’s time to raise a glass to the future of journalism while it’s still nice out.

So I’m happy to report the return, after some months’ hiatus, of the Nieman Lab happy hour. For our Boston/Cambridge-area readers, it’s a chance to have a beer or two and hang out with us Nieman Labbers, some ink-stained wretches, a few journonerds aspirant and existent, ramen-fueled grad students, the faces behind a few public radio voices, freelancers, bloggers, thinkers, doers, beard-strokers, Action Jacksons, and maybe even a few Nieman Fellows. Be there or see your Googlejuice slowly, inexorably dissipate.

This is happening Monday, August 20, starting around 6 p.m. As before, we’ll be gathering at The Field in Central Square. It’s maybe 20 steps from the Central Square Red Line T stop, so if you can get on a subway in Boston, you’re all set. Here’s a map.

The Field has a nice open-air patio in the back — if there’s room, we might be back there. If not, look for reporter’s notebooks. No agenda, just conversation.

I will personally buy a beer for the first 10 people to find me and repeat the nonsense phrase “Jürgen Habermas” three times.

POSTED     Aug. 16, 2012, 5:57 p.m.
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