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Good news, publishers: People will read your long stories on their phones (for two minutes, anyway)
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Sept. 24, 2012, 5:03 p.m.

We print-tweeted the Online News Association conference

We made some tweets for you.

You may have dipped into the fast-moving stream of #ONA12 tweets that came out of the Online News Association conference in San Francisco over the weekend. We wanted to mix things up a little, asking attendees to create physical tweets by jotting down thoughts, drawings, overheards, and other moments from the conference — then tweeting your #IRLtweets creations.

Think of it as a slow tweet movement.

Many thanks to those of you who joined in, and to everyone at ONA for getting us thinking. Here’s a sampling of what we all made:


We also really dug some of the sketched notes that came out of the conference. Check out some from Susie Cagle:

Plus some of Dan Carino’s sketches of the conference:

As well as a few of Graham Clark’s session notes:

What did we miss? We’d love to add your #IRLtweets from ONA to this collection.

POSTED     Sept. 24, 2012, 5:03 p.m.
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