HOME
          
LATEST STORY
A conversation with David Rose, little magazine veteran and publisher of Lapham’s Quarterly
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Dec. 21, 2012, 12:37 a.m.

Mobile, location, data

“Data was the star in 2012 and will continue to be big in 2013.”

Three words: mobile, location, and data.

Mobile

The mobile device is becoming ubiquitous. The statistics speak volumes:

In 2013, we’ll see:

  • More apps and more mobile experiences. We haven’t even hit the tip of this iceberg yet — there will be more mobile news apps developed next year and news organizations (legacy and non-legacy players) will develop new ways of providing a mobile news experience to the end user.
  • More mobile apps for the journalist. This year we saw new tools to help the journalist to do their newsgathering and reporting while on the go with their mobile device, and we’ll continue to see the same trend in 2013. The difference will be that these apps will go beyond a single task (e.g. take a photo, edit a video or capture sound) and become multi-task apps that allow the reporter to do more.

Location

According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, about 74 percent of smartphone owners access location-based information on their phone. Services like Foursquare and Google Maps are just the beginning of what is possible in providing location-aware services that allow mobile phone owners to see how location can provide different meaning and context for daily experiences.

In 2013, we will see more mobile apps with location-aware services. We will see more apps being developed in 2013 that will allow the user to incorporate their location into using the app and getting information — whether that is by zip code, address, or landmark. The developers of these apps most likely will come from outside the news industry — and driven by specific brands and/or products. This will pose a unique challenge to news organizations to innovate in order to keep pace.

Data

Data was the star in 2012 and will continue to be big in 2013. The difference will be the power of mapping data. We have seen the beginnings of how powerful data can be when mapped as part of a story or news coverage ranging from mapping crime data to location (at the street level) to mapping presidential election results to location (at the district, city, state, and national levels). In 2013, we will see:

  • Mapping data software players. Currently, a number of mapping software companies that target news organizations with their services that allow them to map data to a location — that operate under the free and pay model. This trend will continue in 2013 and more players will enter the market focusing their services toward news organizations but also other media industries — entertainment, public relations, advertising to name a few.
  • More data tools for analysis and presentation. As we noted in 2012, the number of services and products to help news organizations and journalists work with data to help tell a story will continue in 2013. The difference will be that there will be more tools coming out that can help with the analysis of large datasets and new forms of presenting that kind of data.
Amy Schmitz Weiss is an assistant professor in the School of Journalism & Media Studies at San Diego State University.
POSTED     Dec. 21, 2012, 12:37 a.m.
PART OF A SERIES     Predictions for Journalism 2013
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
A conversation with David Rose, little magazine veteran and publisher of Lapham’s Quarterly
“I hear the argument, Oh, these poor little magazines with their tiny readerships, if only people appreciated them more. It’s partly true. But the bigger side of that is, well, if only you knew how to read a budget. If only you actually knew anything about publishing.”
The New Inquiry: Not another New York literary magazine
For New Inquiry publisher Rachel Rosenfelt, building cultural significance was easy — building a sustainable business is the hard part.
iOS 8: How 5 news orgs have updated their apps for Apple’s new operating system
ABC, the AP, Breaking News, The Guardian, and The New York Times have all updated apps (or introduced new ones) to take advantage of new features on iOS 8.
What to read next
727
tweets
When it comes to chasing clicks, journalists say one thing but feel pressure to do another
Newsroom ethnographer Angèle Christin studied digital publications in France and the U.S. in order to compare how performance metrics influence culture.
714Wearables could make the “glance” a new subatomic unit of news
“The audience wants to go faster. This can’t be solved with responsive design; it demands an original approach, certainly at the start.”
592Ken Doctor: Guardian Space & Guardian Membership, playing the physical/digital continuum
The Guardian is making its biggest bet on memberships and events by renovating a 30,000 square foot space to host live activities in the heart of London.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Al Jazeera
San Francisco Chronicle
The Batavian
Baristanet
Tribune Publishing
AOL
Placeblogger
Daily Kos
Hearst
Next Door Media
El País
Charlottesville Tomorrow