Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
With Indivisible, public radio stations hope the call-in format will help Americans find common ground
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
March 20, 2013, 10:45 a.m.

From Nieman Reports: Making global local and local global

“Once you relate to something, chances are you are going to be interested and engaged.”
Editor’s note: Our colleagues at our sister publication Nieman Reports are out with their new issue, and there’s a lot of great stuff in there for any journalist to check out. Over the next few days, we’ll share excerpts from a few of the stories that we think would be of most interest to Nieman Lab readers. Be sure to check out the entire issue.

Here, Maria Balinska, founder of Latitude News and former Nieman Fellow, writes about her aim to make the local global and the global local.

nieman-reports-winter-2013My journalism manifesto comes down to three words: local global mashup.

Here’s the back story. I’ve spent my entire career — 18 years of it at the BBC — in international journalism, reporting and editing stories “abroad” for audiences “back home.” But what’s become increasingly clear is that this kind of distinction is artificial. We may all be aware of the fact that we live in a globalized world but it’s not very often that you see journalism that explicitly connects the dots between what’s happening in one country and another. Why is a Brazilian company employing former NASA engineers to build corporate jets in Florida? How did the governor of Nebraska get over 50,000 followers on Weibo, China’s equivalent of Twitter? And what are people in other countries doing about bullying, an urgent problem on the agenda of schools across the U.S.?

To put it colloquially, it’s time to “mashup” (the wonderfully graphic term I’ve borrowed from music and web development) the local and the global. As we’ve found at my journalism startup Latitude News, there’s a gold mine of stories crying out to be told, stories that our readers and listeners say are “fresh”, “powerful” and — here’s the kicker — “relatable to.” Once you relate to something, chances are you are going to be interested and engaged.

Keep reading at Nieman Reports »

POSTED     March 20, 2013, 10:45 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
With Indivisible, public radio stations hope the call-in format will help Americans find common ground
The show is “about understanding the values that we hold and how we want to be — what are our shared hopes and dreams for who we want to be in the world and how are we seen,” says WNYC CEO Laura Walker.
Patreon is helping The Asheville Blade connect directly with readers — and skip over advertisers entirely
“I never have to consider if a story I run is going to make me take a financial hit. That lack of pressure gives us a huge amount of independence.”
ProPublica is leading a nationwide effort to document hate crimes, with local and national partners
“We’re not alone in trying to compile the numbers, and we’re not alone in trying to track all reports.”