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Alexa, give me the news: How outlets are tailoring their coverage for Amazon’s new platform
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April 30, 2013, 1:01 p.m.
LINK: blog.digg.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   April 30, 2013

Digg publishes the results of a user survey and finds that email remains a more popular link-sharing tool than Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or carrier pigeon. (Those Google+ numbers are surprisingly high, though.)

Interestingly, the survey data also supports buzz that Pocket has taken a clear lead over Instapaper and Readability in the read-later space. (This despite Digg parent Betaworks just having bought Instapaper.) Also, on its Google Reader-replacement app in the works:

Free products on the Internet don’t have a great track record. They tend to disappear, leaving users in a lurch. We need to build a product that people can rely on and trust will always be there for them. We’re not sure how pricing might work, but we do know that we’d like our users to be our customers, not our product. So when we asked survey participants whether or not they would be willing to pay, we were pleased to see that over 40% said yes.

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