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April 19, 2013, 11:08 a.m.

Follow along with today’s International Symposium on Online Journalism in Austin

We’re liveblogging the annual conference at the University of Texas, which brings together academics, journalists, and business-side types to talk about the future of news.

isojTeam Nieman Lab is in Austin today and tomorrow for the International Symposium on Online Journalism. It is my favorite future-of-journalism conference every year, and not just because the Tex-Mex is a lot better here than in Boston — it’s a great mix of academics and working professionals saying smart things about where we’re headed.

We’ve built an ISOJ dashboard that pulls in our liveblogging of the conference, the social chatter on Twitter, and the conference livestream. Keep it open in a browser tab today and Saturday.

Here’s that link again. Click.

Also, if you’re in Austin — for ISOJ or just because you have excellent taste in cities — come to our Nieman Lab happy hour tonight. It’s at 6 p.m. Friday at Scholz Garten, 1607 San Jacinto Blvd. We’ll have some free drinks for ISOJ attendees; I’ll buy a limited number more for people who find me and repeat tonight’s magic phrase: Walter Lippmann’s views on democratic governance are widely misunderstood.

POSTED     April 19, 2013, 11:08 a.m.
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