Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Good news, publishers: People will read your long stories on their phones (for two minutes, anyway)
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 9, 2013, 2:24 p.m.
LINK: medium.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 9, 2013

Good piece on Medium from Reuters’ Paul Smalera arguing that the job of editing needs to be integrated with the systems that deliver that content to audiences.

An editor or writer who gets to file her copy into the system and forget about is an editor who is being alienated, in the most Marxist possible way, from the fruits of their labor. That journalist has lost contact with his or her consumer. Editors need to help craft the way their content gets presented to their readers. They themselves don’t have to be designers, coders or even, strictly speaking, ticket-moving product managers. They do need to have a seat at the same table as those other people, and explain the way their content will be most valuable, come to consensus, and then work with those other colleagues to help spec out, design, build and release the code that can bring that value to the reader.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Good news, publishers: People will read your long stories on their phones (for two minutes, anyway)
People will read longer content on their smartphones, a new Pew report finds.
Tampa just lost a daily newspaper; is this the continuation of an old trend or the start of a new one?
Buy a company, milk the cash flow, sell off assets, shut it down: It can be a profitable formula. Is this the end game for some metro newspapers?
With new columns and newsletters, ProPublica is trying to attract new readers and have more fun
“There’s a huge benefit to coming up with features that are more fun and more interesting. It appeals to a different audience and can create closer connections with readers — they can see a different side of us.”
What to read next
0
tweets
“Investigative brand journalism”: The Guardian and Amazon step into the next level of sponsored content
The series isn’t overtly promotional, but its tone is very different from that of recent true crime coverage like Serial and Making a Murderer.
0Hot Pod: As more podcasts become TV shows, can their founders retain creative control?
Plus: Podcasts as time-shifted cable TV; MTV News launches its first podcasts; Postloudness moves beyond Mailchimp.
0Live, local, late breaking: On Facebook Live, news outlets take a cue from TV (but don’t call it TV)
“This opens up all kind of new ways and products to tell stories that are not so focused on production values.”
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
The Economist
Tampa Bay Times
The Globe and Mail
Backfence
TechCrunch
WikiLeaks
Zonie Report
The Miami Herald
Outside.in
Quartz
PBS NewsHour
Plaza Pública