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May 22, 2013, 11:10 a.m.
LINK: responsivenews.co.uk  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 22, 2013

On BBC News developers’ interesting blog on how they’re integrating responsive design into BBC products, the team has posted about how they handle one of the trickiest issues of responsive design — how to deal with images. How can your web page be smart enough to download big, beautiful images when on a big desktop screen and small, optimized ones for a smartphone?

This is an area where standards are still unsettled and there are a lot of competing best practices. The BBC approach involves hardcoding only the first image on a page in the HTML markup and bringing in others selectively via JavaScript. Also:

As the BBC News site publishes MANY articles everyday, many images are published too. BBC News has an automated process to create 18 different versions of each published image.

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