Nieman Foundation at Harvard
This Indian startup wants to free — and find stories in — public data that’s messy and inaccessible
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May 7, 2013, 12:45 p.m.
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   May 7, 2013

The AP is fine-tuning its social media guidelines for reporters, specifically on how to exercise caution while tweeting. Given the confusion and misinformation that spread around the Boston Marathon bombing story, not to mention its recent recent Twitter hacking, the news service wants its reporters to exercise extreme caution, saying “Staffers are advised to avoid spreading unconfirmed rumors through tweets and posts.” More:

Today, we’re releasing the latest version of our social media guidelines for AP employees, and a key update is a new set of guidance on how (and whether) to use social networks to get information and amateur content from people who are in danger, or who have suffered a significant personal loss.

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