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June 28, 2013, noon
LINK: cyber.law.harvard.edu  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   June 28, 2013

If you enjoyed our Q&A with author Douglas Rushkoff — author of Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now — you’ll enjoy this video of Rushkoff speaking at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society last week:

The always-on, simultaneous society in which we have found ourselves has altered our relationship to culture, media, news, politics, economics, and power. We are living in a digital temporal landscape, but instead of exploiting its asynchronous biases, we are misguidedly attempting to extend the time-is-money agenda of the Industrial Age into the current era. The result is a disorienting and dehumanizing mess, where the zombie apocalypse is more comforting to imagine than more of the same. It needn’t be this way. Douglas Rushkoff — teacher, documentarian, journalist, and author — discusses insights from his recent book “Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now” with David Weinberger and a live audience at Harvard.

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