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The newsonomics of auctioning off Digital First’s newspapers (and California schemin’)
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June 3, 2013, 12:49 p.m.
LINK: www.washingtonpost.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   June 3, 2013

Erik Wemple has a good take at The Washington Post, and Politico’s Dylan Byers has the memo. Wemple:

It’s a colossal move. Glasser is a big name in Washington journalism, fresh off of five years spent turning Foreign Policy into a digital force. The magazine had significant print bona fides at the time of its September 2008 purchase by The Washington Post Co., yet its Web presence lagged behind the standards of the time. Upon taking the job, Glasser quickly finished off a redo of foreignpolicy.com that had been in the works — and the magazine’s Web evolution hasn’t slowed since. According to a news release from the Foreign Policy Group, the magazine’s site tallied 4.4 million unique visitors in April, breaking readership records…

Glasser will have a twofold mandate at Politico: One is producing long-form pieces with significant gestation periods. Much of this stuff will land in a new Politico magazine that will come out at least six times per year, according to Politico Executive Editor Jim VandeHei. This magazine will be “stocked with profiles, investigative reporting and provocative analysis.” The other is to generate “of-the-moment” opinion pieces off of the news — kind of a faster-paced version of what Glasser did when she helmed the Outlook section of The Post. The goal is two such pieces per day.

We’ve written a number of times about Glasser’s work at FP.

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LINK: next.theguardian.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   September 29, 2014

The Guardian has a new setup for its liveblogs that aims to fix some of their eternal problems — chief among them that they’re great for in-the-moment following along, but cryptic and unnavigable after the fact:

Paul Owen, who is responsible for the Guardian’s UK live blogs, said: “Once live blogs have been going for more than an hour or two, it becomes difficult for a new reader to start reading; by that point the live blog has often become rather long and unwieldy.

“For a while we have asked the live bloggers to periodically add bullet-point summaries of key events – say at the beginning of the blog, half way through the day, and when wrapping up. But these only really help if the new reader starts reading the blog soon after a summary has been published.

“So we hope pulling up key events into a clickable list at the top or top left of each live blog will now help readers navigate through a live blog at whatever point they choose to join it. Summaries will remain too, though.”

You can see an example of the new look here. I rather like it; the commenters under that post don’t.

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Capital New York give us a look at The New York Times’ native advertising business in a profile of Meredith Kopit Levien, its executive vice president for advertising, and it appears to be growing. Since launching earlier this year, it’s struck deals with 32 different brands — from Netflix to Thomson Reuters — to create ads that cost from $25,000 to more than $200,000 just to create.

And the Times’ in-house content studio, T Brand Studio, is up to a staff of 16 — up from nine when my colleague Justin Ellis wrote about the Times’ approach native advertising in June.

The build up of the Times’ native advertising capacity is part of a larger overhaul of its advertising department that began when Levien took over as the executive vice president for advertising in July 2013. She’s replaced about one-third of the current staff with new hires, bringing on more than 80 staffers. Of those who left, about half were offered buyouts or early retirement, “a move that some interpreted as a way of nudging older employees out the door,” Capital writes.

Print continues to generate most of the Times’ advertising revenue, but with its continued emphasis on native and digital advertising, especially video, Levian said she’s optimistic: “We’re certainly not going to put up a victory banner yet, but we are beginning to find our way into what feels like a sustainable path toward growing the digital business.”

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LINK: speakerdeck.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   September 23, 2014

Page speed is an underrated part of user experience. A fast website is a website readers will return to more often and feel better about using. (Add WPO to SEO and SMO in your mental acronym storage case.)

We’ve shared before about efforts at The Guardian and The New York Times to get faster, and now we’ve got a new slide deck from Times developer Eitan Koningsburg on the sometimes counterintuitive things they’ve done to speed up NYTimes.com (including the earlier [thanks, Allen] strange-sounding-to-me use of an intentional blocking script to load ads better):

The current mantra in performance thinking is “Tools not Rules.” The premise is simple: The path to faster websites is not only about fast requests, but how they interact with paints, animations, and script execution. But tools are only part of the solution. What The New York Times discovered is that performance is about truly understanding your product and users, and the sum total of your site. Following this approach can lead to surprising results.

The New York Times underwent a major redesign that involved a rewrite of the entire technology stack. The Product team not only bought into the idea that performance should be a goal, but mandated that it be part of the product’s success. While we implemented many of the community’s best practices, our biggest wins were a little surprising, and at first glance, counter to community best practices. Front-end software architect Eitan Koningsburg covers those changes, what worked, what didn’t, and how we got there.

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Is Aaron Kushner thinking of getting out of L.A.? The owner and publisher of the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Register told an audience at the Portada Hispanic Advertising and Media Conference he’ll be considering the paper’s future:

Aaron Kushner, CEO of Freedom Communications, said that he will evaluate “in the next few weeks” whether the Los Angeles Register has a viable future as a daily. The Los Angeles Register was launched in April of this year in the Los Angeles, CA market, where it competes with other dailies including the Los Angeles Times. Kushner’s comments, which were made during an on-stage interview conducted by Portada publisher Marcos Baer during Portada’s 8th Annual Hispanic Advertising and Media Conference, are the first explicit references by Freedom Communications CEO about the possibility of discontinuing daily publication of the Los Angeles Register.

The paper’s had a rocky existence so far, and the timing of Kushner’s remarks will probably only fuel rumors about the fate of the paper. The Los Angeles Register debuted in April, but by June Freedom had instituted a company-wide furlough program and was offering voluntary buyout packages.

Of course, evaluating can mean a lot of things. But that Kushner would say he’s evaluating the status of the L.A. paper, rather than praising the investment, chastising critics, or trying to stoke an old-fashioned newspaper war, is no small sign. Kushner also told the crowd Freedom Communications’ weekly papers, along with dailies like the OC Register and The Press Enterprise are responsible for “low single-digit revenue growth rate” at the company.

Update, 9/23: Well, that was quick:

The Los Angeles Register, which launched in April as part Aaron Kushner’s bold bet on print newspapers, will cease publication, effective immediately.

Orange County Register co-owner Aaron Kushner announced the decision Monday night in a memo sent to employees.

“Pundits and local competitors who have closely followed our entry into Los Angeles will be quick to criticize our decision to launch a new newspaper and they will say that we failed,” said the memo, signed by Kushner and his Freedom Communications co-owner Eric Spitz.

“We believe, the true definition of failure is not taking bold steps toward growth.”

The memo hints at layoffs, but provided no specific details.

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The American Press Institute’s Lisa Zimmermann has a detailed piece that tries to answer that question. And the solutions don’t always have to involve big investments in technology; here’s one take from Spokane:

The Spokesman-Review in Washington State changed its commenting policy in August 2014. “We no longer will allow comments to be posted on national or international stories, or letters to the editor,” wrote editor Gary Graham, noting that the comments will be allowed on local stories, staff blogs and staff columns, but that these discussions will no longer take place beneath the content. Instead readers now click the link provided where they are brought to a separate page for discussion.

Graham said the two goals behind these changes were to “encourage more constructive and civil discourse on local issues” and to reduce the amount of time staff spend monitoring comments. “It’s no secret that our newsroom ranks are much smaller in the wake of the economic tsunami that has wreaked havoc on the industry, and time spent moderating comments is time we cannot spend on research, reporting and editing,” he wrote.

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