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July 1, 2013, 1:45 p.m.
LINK: phx.corporate-ir.net  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   July 1, 2013

The New York Times is out with some interesting new ad formats specifically tailored for their iPad app. Developed by the Times’ Idea Lab, the new formats emphasize interactivity and a push to connect the app to other features on the iPad, including:

In-App Download: This capability allows for a user to purchase and download any selection of media that is available in iTunes, all within the ad unit. This includes music or video available in iTunes, but also proprietary apps that advertisers might wish to promote to users of The Times’s iPad app.

Direct Coupon Download: Users can download a special offer, ticket or coupon from an ad unit that saves directly to their iPad Photo Stream, resulting in it being saved to the consumer’s other devices, such as an iPhone.

Calendar: Allows users to download and save information directly into their iPad calendar to help them schedule appointments and reminders tied to special offers or events.

Panorama: Users can visually pan around a 360-degree environment using touch and swipe motions. For example, advertisers may use this feature to display a retail location.

A number of other Idea Lab custom units will also now be available in-app for the first time, including Pleats, which offers advertisers four distinct panels to showcase full-screen images in expanded format through an XXL unit; Unveil, which allows users to interact with a brand message by “wiping away” an initial image to reveal another one underneath it; and Product Zoom, a newsroom-inspired ad concept that can showcase a product’s finer details through magnification as a user moves the cursor over the image.

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