Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Newsonomics: On end games and end times
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Oct. 23, 2013, 12:10 p.m.

Earlier this month, the Pew Journalism Project confirmed once again that local television is still the way the majority of Americans get their news.

Today, NetNewsCheck announced a new weekly column that will focus on local media. Broadcast television veteran Terry Heaton will write the column, which is aimed at pushing the producers of local media toward a better “understanding of evolving audiences.” He writes:

Most people in the business of local television follow what those inside the industry are saying, which is basically, “Move along, there’s nothing to see here” and “See? We’re the top local preference for news” or “Advertisers spend more money with us than anybody else.”

In certain ways, by turning a blind eye to caution signs on the road ahead, they’re right. Local broadcasters had an all-time record revenue year in 2012, and when one lives by the quarterly report, everything looks just fine. The newspaper collapse began with a record year, however, so that’s hardly a bellwether of comfort and joy. And of course, industry leaders aren’t about to give credence to any alternate view, so the NAB’s annual conferences, for example, completely ignore important questions we should be discussing.

Heaton goes on to detail a list of over a dozen questions and trends he intends to address, with a focus on trends in marketing and public policy.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Newsonomics: On end games and end times
Can publishers find a sustainable business model this new age of Facebook/Apple/Snapchat/Twitter/Google distributed content? And is local news destined to be left behind?
What Scribd’s growing pains mean for the future of digital content subscription models
It turns out that ebook subscription models don’t work very well when people read too much. So what happens next?
How research (and PowerPoints) became the backbone of National Journal’s membership program
“We no longer look at National Journal simply as a news source, but as a collection of resources, as well as a collection of experts we can turn to on occasion.”
What to read next
2843
tweets
A blow for mobile advertising: The next version of Safari will let users block ads on iPhones and iPads
Think making money on mobile advertising is hard now? Think how much more difficult it will be with a significant share of your audience is blocking all your ads — all with a simple download from the App Store.
1763For news organizations, this was the most important set of Apple announcements in years
A new Flipboard-clone with massive potential reach, R.I.P. Newsstand, and news stories embedded deeper inside iOS — it was a big day for news on iPhones and iPads.
762Newsonomics: 10 numbers that define the news business today
From video to social, from mobile to paywalls — these data points help define where we are in the “future of news” today, like it or not.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Center for Public Integrity
NBC News
Flipboard
Lens
The Philadelphia Inquirer & Daily News
Grist
The Daily Beast
Drudge Report
The Wall Street Journal
St. Louis Globe-Democrat
American Independent News Network
Animal Político