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Dec. 9, 2013, 1:01 p.m.
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   December 9, 2013

spark-camp-300pxSpark Camp is a future-of-news conference, I guess, if you want to be loose with that definition. But it’s a different animal than ONA or SXSW or NICAR or ISOJ or any of the other big names in the space. It’s a small, curated, topic-focused gathering that tries to build community as it builds content (I’m sure they’d hate that word in this context, but it fits). I’ve been to a couple, and we’ve hosted two here at the Nieman Foundation; we even published some of their work last fall. They’re compelling events.

Now, Spark Camp has published a new guide on how to run a good event called “Mastering the Art of Sparking Connections: How to Build an Event That Matters More.” (PDF available too.) Lots of good ideas in there.

There’s also some info on how Spark Camp will be evolving:

We envision Spark Camp evolving into a next-generation collective — a pop-up think tank that fosters creative thinking and sparks real-world action.

Starting in 2014, we’ll begin iterating new formats, such as one-day Spark Summits. We’ll also be collaborating with companies, foundations and nonprofits to host discussions on specialized topics, such as reinventing education, reimagining how cities work and the future of work. We’ll also look to extend the impact of Spark Camp itself, hosting more Camps and adding alumni gatherings and ongoing alumni services. As we expand, our mission will remain the same: cultivating multidisciplinary professional experiences that produce both deep personal enrichment and powerful outcomes.

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Google announces a $300M ‘Google News Initiative’ (though this isn’t about giving out grants directly to newsrooms, like it does in Europe)
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