Nieman Foundation at Harvard
If the Philadelphia newspapers wanted to convert to nonprofits, what would stand in their way?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 9, 2014, 2:09 p.m.
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   January 9, 2014

Good piece from Mathew Ingram on how easy it is to be overwhelmed by the stream of Twitter:

It’s not that unfollowing people on Twitter is difficult — it’s just a click of a button. But first I would have to decide why I was unfollowing that person, and that would require thinking about why I followed them in the first place. I would have to look at their stream and reconsider their value, and I would have to do that 3,000 times. It’s like cleaning out the garage or indexing your photos; you know that you should do it, but it just seems so daunting that you never get around to it.

That helps explain my interest in tools that help you track who has unfollowed you, and others that show people you follow who aren’t very active…

For Twitter, one problem is that the company seems focused on adding millions of news users — and oceans of new content through deals with TV networks, etc. — rather than on making things easier for existing users, in part because building up its user base helps justify its multibillion-dollar market value. But if users ultimately just find themselves overwhelmed, that could be a Faustian bargain. The stream can be a harsh mistress.

I think this is right, and a reminder that one of the best services a news organization can provide to its audience is letting it know what it can safely ignore.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
If the Philadelphia newspapers wanted to convert to nonprofits, what would stand in their way?
Some sort of attachment with Temple University could be in the works. But nonprofit law could throw up a number of obstacles to making that happen.
Medium partners with publications like The Awl and Fusion, and more native ads are on the way
Medium is rolling out a slew of changes, including publisher partnerships, updated apps, and plans for advertising.
4 takeaways from The New York Times’ new digital strategy memo
With a renewed focus on subscriptions, the Times believes it can double its digital revenue to $800 million in 2020.
What to read next
What happened after 7 news sites got rid of reader comments
Recode, Reuters, Popular Science, The Week, Mic, The Verge, and USA Today’s FTW have all shut off reader comments in the past year. Here’s how they’re all using social media to encourage reader discussion.
699Facebook woos journalists with Signal, a dashboard to gather news across Facebook and Instagram
Signal helps journalists find, source, and embed content from Facebook and Instagram.
672Get AMP’d: Here’s what publishers need to know about Google’s new plan to speed up your website
The speed gains are very real. But do publishers want to trade in the open space of what we’ve known as the web for yet another platform they have little control over?
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
The Awl
CBS News
The Globe and Mail
National Review
U.S. News & World Report
Animal Político
The Atlantic
California Watch