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Feb. 19, 2014, 1:13 p.m.
LINK: jobs.nytco.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   February 19, 2014

I think that’s a fair takeaway from this job posting for an iOS developer (emphasis mine).

nytimes-logoEvery day the New York Times delivers our journalism to millions of readers through our native iPhone and iPad applications. Now we’re looking to expand on that success by launching new mobile applications around focused topics such as dining, travel and health. We’re looking for iOS developers to join a small team of designers, editors and product managers as we develop these new products from concept to App Store submission.

Nothing shocking there, of course, but it would seem to confirm the idea that the new set of paid products expected in the coming months will have both native-app and web components to them.

It’s also the first time (I think? could be wrong here) we’ve seen travel and health mooted publicly as top-tier candidates for new-product status. (Dining, the new Need to Know product, and something from opinion were the three candidates Ken Doctor got out of Mark Thompson late last year.)

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