Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Spain’s Eldiario.es has 18,000 paying members, and its eye on the next several million
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Oct. 27, 2015, 3:18 p.m.
Reporting & Production
NarcoData

NarcoData is a new collaboration that aims to track and visualize the drug cartels of Mexico

When the Mexican digital news site Animal Politico obtained previously classified government documents on drug cartels, it wanted to figure out the best way to unleash the “great potential” of the data.

NarcoData, a collaboration between Mexican digital news site Animal Politico and data journalism platform Poderopedia, launched Tuesday with a mission to shine light on organized crime and drug trafficking in Mexico.

“The Mexican state has failed in giving its citizens accurate, updated, and systematic information about the fight against organized crime,” said Dulce Ramos, editor-in-chief of Animal Politico and the general coordinator for NarcoData. “NarcoData wants to fill that empty space.”

The site examines four decades of data to explain how drug trafficking reached its current size and influence in the country. The idea for the project came about last year, when Animal Politico obtained, via the Mexican transparency act, a government chart outlining all of the criminal cells operating in the country. Instead of immediately publishing an article with the data, Animal Politico delved further to fill in the information that the document was missing.

Even a couple of months later, when the document went public and some legacy media outlets wrote articles about it and made infographics from it, “we remained sure that that document had great potential, and we didn’t want to waste it,” Ramos said. Instead, Animal Politico requested and obtained more documents and corroborated the data with information from books, magazines, and interviews.

NarcoData’s platform was designed by Poderopedia, the data visualization company founded by Chilean investigative journalist and former Nieman-Berkman fellow Miguel Paz. One of Poderopedia’s initial projects was to document a who’s who of the most powerful people in Chile. That mission has expanded to document the leaders of Venezuela and Colombia, and, more broadly, to find better ways of doing journalism using technology across Latin America.

Poderopedia and Animal Politico collaborated on the visualizations. “One of the goals was to learn, together, better ways to structure information and have team workflows that worked well over two time zones and different professional backgrounds,” Paz said. “It was a great partnership experience on every level.” Funding came from HacksLabs, Hivos, the Avina Foundation, and the International Center for Journalists.

NarcoData is one of a growing number of projects that seek to provide context and visualization around previously obscured or hard-to-collect data on issues like gun violence. Encuentros Mortales, for example, is a Spanish-language site tracking killings of undocumented immigrants; its sister site, Fatal Encounters, counts police-officer-involved homicides in the U.S, as does The Guardian’s The Counted.

Going forward, the NarcoData team plans to release several new visualizations, to delve further back in Mexico’s drug-trafficking history, and to track cartel activity year-by-year throughout President Enrique Peña Nieto’s term.

“I see NarcoData as a great building block for many new projects to come,” Paz said.

POSTED     Oct. 27, 2015, 3:18 p.m.
SEE MORE ON Reporting & Production
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Spain’s Eldiario.es has 18,000 paying members, and its eye on the next several million
“We have a potential of six million readers. You may not convince all six million people to be your socios, but if you learn more about their interests, you can get closer.”
Chasing subscriptions over scale, The Athletic wants to turn local sports fandom into a sustainable business — starting in Chicago
“It’s very easy today to be click-driven and produce articles that don’t have a lot of substance or depth and don’t cost that much to produce, but that dynamic is disappointing for fans who want higher-quality content.”
Hot Pod: We now have new, free rankings to show how podcasts stack up against each other
Plus: Parsing the RadioPublic announcement; premium podcast subscriptions; Bill Simmons oversimplifies things.
What to read next
0
tweets
Hot Pod: As more podcasts become TV shows, can their founders retain creative control?
Plus: Podcasts as time-shifted cable TV; MTV News launches its first podcasts; Postloudness moves beyond Mailchimp.
0The Hindustan Times is working to build the definitive online source of real-time air quality in all of India
In addition to pulling in data from government stations for its map, the organization is deploying and testing its own air quality sensors across the country.
0A new growth area for foreign reporting: podcasts? With reporters in-country, GroundTruth hopes so
“There’s pretty much nothing, as far as I can tell, in terms of real, international, on-the-ground reporting in the world of podcasting.”
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Fuego is our heat-seeking Twitter bot, tracking the links the future-of-journalism crowd is talking about most on Twitter.
Here are a few of the top links Fuego’s currently watching.   Get the full Fuego ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
The UpTake
ABC News
BBC News
Franklin Center
Craigslist
The Weekly Standard
Kaiser Health News
Detroit Free Press and Detroit News
Al Jazeera
Voice of San Diego
Global Voices
Backfence