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In Winnipeg, micropayments aren’t generating big money, but they’re serving as a top-of-the-funnel strategy
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Aug. 30, 2017, 11:23 a.m.
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LINK: www.research.net  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   August 30, 2017

OpenNews’ second survey aimed at journalism-focused developers and code-focused journalists — “News Nerds,” as it refers to them — opened Wednesday and runs through September 9. You can take it here. Through the survey, done in partnership with Google News Lab, OpenNews hopes to learn more about the community’s demographics and experience working in newsrooms. The results of the survey will be released in December at SRCCON:Work, a new spinoff of the SRCCON conference that will dig into “how we as a community take care of each other and take on the hard work of journalism.”

“There’s been a ton of conversation in the past few months about career trajectories, roles, and hiring,” said Erika Owens, OpenNews deputy director. Soo Oh, a news app developer at Vox.com who is also a Knight fellow at Stanford this year, is looking at those topics as part of her fellowship and advised on the survey. “We’re asking geographic questions, salary questions, a lot more about roles and teams so we can get a clearer picture into the career trajectories in the field,” Owens said.

Liam Andrew, a developer at the Texas Tribune (and former Nieman Labber), advised on adding questions to the survey from the smaller nonprofit newsroom perspective.

One of the main, not-so-surprising findings of last year’s survey was that the journalism-tech community is predominantly male and white. This year’s survey includes more questions about workplace diversity — asking, for instance, about different types of harassment and microaggression respondents may have experienced, as well as about newsrooms’ existing policies — to get a better sense of what newsrooms are already doing and to give people in the community ideas on what to advocate for at work. “We are going to create potentially actionable data around this,” Owens said.

The survey is here.

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