Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 26, 2018, 9:24 a.m.
LINK: posts.google.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   January 26, 2018

Google is testing a hyperlocal news app called Bulletin in Nashville and Oakland. It’s an “app for telling a story by capturing photos, videoclips and text right from your phone, published straight to the web (without having to create a blog or build a website).” If you’re thinking “sounds like [Twitter/Snapchat/fill in any other company here],” as I was, one difference seems to be the more open publishing format: “Bulletin stories are public and easy to discover: on Google search, through social networks, or via links sent by email and messaging apps.” They appear to be hooked in with Google News. (I also saw comparisons to NextDoor, which again is private; NextDoor posts can’t be found in Google search.)

Google announced Bulletin at an event in Nashville Thursday, which Slate has video of. There are some (boring) examples of what the stories look like here If you’re in either Nashville or Oakland, you can request access, but it’s Android-only for now.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
“For us, this is a way to let people read and ask questions at their own pace, instead of having them read through long screens of text. Often people aren’t engaged in stories because they haven’t had the right context.”
Can we keep media literacy from becoming a partisan concept like fact checking?
Plus: Screen time debates, and what the data says about kids and smartphones.
After years of testing, The Wall Street Journal has built a paywall that bends to the individual reader
Non-subscribers visiting WSJ.com now get a score, based on dozens of signals, that indicates how likely they’ll be to subscribe. The paywall tightens or loosens accordingly: “The content you see is the output of the paywall, rather than an input.”