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The “backfire effect” is mostly a myth, a broad look at the research suggests
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March 6, 2018, 2:07 p.m.
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LINK: www.nytimes.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   March 6, 2018

Look, it’s no New York Times’ first tweet, but what follows is the oral history of how The New York Times got shruggie into a headline.

I asked the story’s author, Jonah Bromwich, how this was able to happen.

For the record, Nieman Lab is a huge fan of this decision (I mean: this, this, this, not that shruggie is an emoji). The decision was criticized in meteorology circles. We’re still not sure how much snow we’re going to get.

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