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Will Vox’s new section on effective altruism…well, do any good?
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Will Vox’s new section on effective altruism…well, do any good?
“It came out of a sense that there were some really important topics with impacts on human beings that didn’t get as much coverage in traditional journalism sections and pieces.”
By Christine Schmidt
Chasing leads and herding cats: How journalism’s latest job title — partner manager — works in ProPublica’s newsroom
“In short, we came to think that the collaboration itself was something that needed editing.”
By Rachel Glickhouse
What have tech companies done wrong with fake news? Google (yep) lists the ways
Plus: A woman-oriented fact-checking initiative, and possible problems with California’s media literacy bill.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Trump’s USA Today op-ed demonstrates why it’s time to unbundle news and opinion content
“At a time when both the public and algorithms are trying to understand what journalism means and how to distinguish between news and opinion, publishers should make it more clear what makes journalism special.”
By Eli Pariser
The Outline built itself on being “weird.” But is it weird enough to survive?
“We’re not the enemy. This is a really shitty industry for writers.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
A Chorus of publishers: Vox Media onboards the Chicago Sun-Times as its first licensee since launch
“The joke in the industry is everybody doesn’t like the CMS or they write in some other tool.” Vox Media aims to change that punchline for other publishers.
By Christine Schmidt
Venture philanthropy for local news might not be as scary as it sounds
The American Journalism Project, led by two top nonprofit news veterans, aims to propel $1 billion in annual investments to mission-driven local news outlets.
By Christine Schmidt
What is up with Apple’s screwy (and seemingly scammy) podcast charts?
Plus: Spotify opens up its podcast section to everyone, Google bets on small producers, and The New York Times goes roundtable.
By Nicholas Quah
Stat, with subscriptions nearing 50 percent of revenue, looks to big companies for more members
“We’ve become focused a little more on the paying subscribers.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Here’s how much Americans trust 38 major news organizations (hint: not all that much!)
About 13 percent of Americans don’t trust any news outlet at all. (They went 2-to-1 for Trump in 2016.)
By Joshua Benton
A new study provides some dispiriting evidence for why people fall for stupid fake images online
Plus: A U.K. report calls for governments to tread cautiously when it comes to fake news, as some other governments seem prepared to do the opposite.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Requiem for a Tronc
A bad name stumbles into the sunset.
By Joshua Benton
Will Vox’s new section on effective altruism…well, do any good?
“It came out of a sense that there were some really important topics with impacts on human beings that didn’t get as much coverage in traditional journalism sections and pieces.”
By Christine Schmidt
Chasing leads and herding cats: How journalism’s latest job title — partner manager — works in ProPublica’s newsroom
“In short, we came to think that the collaboration itself was something that needed editing.”
What have tech companies done wrong with fake news? Google (yep) lists the ways
Plus: A woman-oriented fact-checking initiative, and possible problems with California’s media literacy bill.
What We’re Reading
Talking Points Memo / Josh Marshall
Talking Points Memo is launching a super-premium tier called TPM Inside
A level above its current paid product, TPM Prime. “Think of Inside like a running conversation we’re going to hold with the most interesting and knowledgable people in the world of politics, public policy and elections, which we’re inviting you to be a part of.”
White House Watch / Dan Froomkin
“Good luck separating ‘journalism’ and ‘opinion’ in the age of Trump”
A response to Eli Pariser’s Nieman Lab piece: “Especially in this day and age, you need a heavy does of context and analysis to make sense of what’s being said and done. ‘Straight’ stenography, in contrast, is the opposite of journalism.”
WIRED / Angela Watercutter
Climate scientists are playing Fortnite on Twitch while explaining global warming to educate teens
“Amid the shoot-outs and loot-grabs, the streamer in the headset is also very patiently explaining methane emissions to a user named Xoiiku. Usually when someone brings up burping and farting during gameplay, it’s a prank at best. This time it’s definitely not.”
The Economist / Evan Hensleigh
The Economist will publish the numbers behind its data reporting on GitHub
“While we take care to identify our sources, we have not often published the data behind them. Sometimes, this is for good reason: some data are proprietary or otherwise not ours to publish. Often, we have simply not made the time to do it. This is a shame.”
Digiday / Lucia Moses
How The Washington Post’s User Lab balances advertiser and subscriber demands
“So far the lab has tested its branded content disclosures (it validated The Post’s current use of ‘from’ an advertiser, as opposed to ‘presented by’ or ‘brought to you by’). It’s also created four new ad formats. It found that people preferred being served contextually relevant articles over retargeted ads, so it created Showcase, which bundles Post articles that are relevant to the reader into an ad unit.”
TechCrunch / Josh Constine
Instagram is testing replacing scrolling with tapping, making the feed more like Stories
“Tap to advance, pioneered by Snapchat, eliminates the need for big thumbstrokes on your touch screen that can get tiring after awhile. It also means users always see media full-screen rather than having to fiddle with scrolling the perfect amount to see an entire post.”
The Cut / Ruth Spencer
Stephen Elliott sues Moira Donegan, creator of Shitty Media Men list
“According to the suit, Elliott also intends to sue other women who contributed to the Google spreadsheet (who he names as “Jane Does”), which briefly circulated last October and contained the names of over of 70 men who were anonymously accused of sexual misconduct, ranging from rape to harassment.” A GoFundMe for Donegan’s legal expenses is here.
The New York Times / Millie Tran
How the New York Times’ first-ever global growth editor operates
“I’m rarely without my phone or some piece of technology and do believe in making tech work for me and my life, not the other way around.”
ProPublica
Here’s ProPublica Illinois’s first year in review
“As a team, we set out our goals even before we officially opened our doors. We wanted to tell stories that would otherwise go untold. We wanted to strengthen the journalism ecosystem we had joined. And we wanted to help build a community of journalists and a body of journalistic work representative of the world around us, examining issues of importance to communities that are often overlooked and bringing those stories into the lives of the people most affected by them. Some 150 articles later, we are well on our way. “
Deadline Hollywood / Mike Fleming Jr.
Netflix will finance and release “The Laundromat,” about the Panama Papers scandal
Steven Soderbergh directs; cast includes Meryl Streep, Gary Oldman, David Schwimmer, and Antonio Banderas.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.