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How to cover pols who lie, and why facts don’t always change minds: Updates from the fake-news world
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Articles by Shan Wang

Shan Wang is a staff writer at the Lab. She previously worked in editorial at Harvard University Press, and has reported for Boston.com and the New England Center for Investigative Reporting. One of the first news stories she ever wrote was about Muggle Quidditch for The Harvard Crimson. She was born in Shanghai, grew up in Connecticut and Massachusetts, and is a Ray Allen devotee.
@shansquared
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“This ‘news’ is there to influence the political process in Germany, and we think it’s very important to put them straight.”
The news site has an unusual policy on crime reporting: No names or mugshots of those arrested unless they’re public figures, the arrest is judged to be a public emergency, or its reporters are able to interview the accused directly.
“We’re still quite a ways off from that being a majority of our revenue, but for publishers in general, the ones that thrive I believe will be the ones that make subscribers and members the majority of their revenue.”
“Think of all these sites as the digital, non-linear television arm of Univision.”
Reporters and editors from prominent news organizations waded through the challenges (new and old) of reporting in the current political climate during a Harvard University event on Tuesday night.
“Somebody asked me, ‘Whose market share are you trying to steal?’ That’s not really how we’re thinking about this.”
Its latest international expansion targets an English-speaking country whose native newspapers have struggled — but whose citizens haven’t been notably keen on paying for online news.