Press Publish http://www.niemanlab.org/category/press-publish/ Press Publish is a weekly conversation about journalism, technology, and the media business. Mon, 22 Dec 2014 16:58:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Press Publish is a weekly conversation with the people building the future of news: journalists, technologists, entrepreneurs, and more. Produced by the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard. Nieman Journalism Lab no Nieman Journalism Lab joshua_benton@harvard.edu joshua_benton@harvard.edu (Nieman Journalism Lab) Press Publish Press Publish http://www.niemanlab.org/images/press-publish-1400px.jpg http://www.niemanlab.org/category/press-publish/ Weekly Press Publish 10: Tiffany Shackelford on the future of alt weeklies after the Boston Phoenix http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/04/press-publish-10-tiffany-shackelford-on-the-future-of-alt-weeklies-after-the-boston-phoenix/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/04/press-publish-10-tiffany-shackelford-on-the-future-of-alt-weeklies-after-the-boston-phoenix/#comments Wed, 03 Apr 2013 19:23:15 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=79025 tiffany-shackelfordIt’s Episode 10 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Tiffany Shackelford, executive director of Association of Alternative Newsmedia, until recently known as the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. They’re the trade group for alt weeklies in the U.S. — your Village Voices, your Chicago Readers, your Seattle Weeklies — and until recently, the Boston Phoenix.

The legendary Boston alt weekly surprised the publishing world last month when it announced it was closing after 47 years. That led to a new round of concerns about the future of alt weeklies, which have seen a lot of the same revenue declines that dailies have over the past decade. And when daily newspapers were strong, it was easy to know who the alt weeklies were an alternative to; now there’s no shortage of alternatives to the alternative.

press-publish-logoTiffany believes that alts still have a solid future ahead of them, particularly in markets smaller than Boston. We talked about how their revenue mix is shifting, how some alts are changing their publication cycle and becoming more heavily digital, and who are the model players that other publishers should be watching. If you’re interested in the future of some of America’s most prominent newspaper brands, give our conversation a listen.

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/04/press-publish-10-tiffany-shackelford-on-the-future-of-alt-weeklies-after-the-boston-phoenix/feed/ 0 They face many of the same financial challenges as their daily peers — how many alt weeklies can navigate a path to sustainability? They face many of the same financial challenges as their daily peers — how many alt weeklies can navigate a path to sustainability? Nieman Journalism Lab no 47:36
Press Publish 9: Pew’s Amy Mitchell on the “challenged” state of the news media in 2013 http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/03/press-publish-9-pews-amy-mitchell-on-the-challenged-state-of-the-news-media-in-2013/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/03/press-publish-9-pews-amy-mitchell-on-the-challenged-state-of-the-news-media-in-2013/#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2013 14:23:39 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=77915 amy-mitchell-tallIt’s Episode 9 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Amy Mitchell, acting director for the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism.

This morning, Pew came out with its latest edition of the State of the Media, its annual analysis of where the news business stands. It’s a must-read every year, and Amy and I were able to chat about a sneak peak at it late last week.

While it may be true that the state of the union is forever “strong,” it’s hard to argue the same about the news industry. Pew’s report goes into the continued financial decline of traditional news outlets (and the hopeful signs of new revenue streams); it examines how the new news ecosystem is changing audience habits; and it looks at the declining state of local television, still the No. 1 source of news for Americans.

press-publish-logoPew’s great at combining original survey research with a keen analytical eye, and their reports are some of the most valuable resources we have to move from ideas to real data. If you’re interested in stepping back a bit and understanding how 2013 is looking different from 2012 or 2011, give it a listen.

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And here’s the giant infographic Pew assembled to illustrate its findings:

2013-State-of-the-News-Media-Overview-Infographic1

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/03/press-publish-9-pews-amy-mitchell-on-the-challenged-state-of-the-news-media-in-2013/feed/ 0 Sports, weather, and traffic now fill 40 percent of local television news — while crime, politics, and government coverage are all down. Sports, weather, and traffic now fill 40 percent of local television news — while crime, politics, and government coverage are all down. Nieman Journalism Lab no 50:03
Press Publish 8: Clay Christensen on the disruption of journalism http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-8-clay-christensen-on-the-disruption-of-journalism/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-8-clay-christensen-on-the-disruption-of-journalism/#comments Thu, 28 Feb 2013 15:35:05 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=76764 clay-christensen-ccIt’s Episode 8 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! Our guests this week are Harvard Business School professor Clay Christensen and David Skok, the director of digital at Globalnews.ca in Canada.

Normally, episodes of Press Publish feature me having an extended conversation with someone doing interesting work in journalism innovation. This one’s different — it’s actually a recording of an event we held here at the Nieman Foundation last night.

nieman-reports-fall-2012-clay-skokDoes Clay Christensen really need an introduction at this point? Once you’ve been named the top management thinker in the world, I imagine not. Clay is the man behind disruptive innovation, the theory of how industries respond to technological changes that alter access to products or services. His book The Innovator’s Dilemma is one of the most influential business books of the past two decades, and his Newspaper Next project in 2006 provided an alternate vision of what a more agile U.S. newspaper business might have looked like.

press-publish-logoDavid was a Nieman Fellow last year, and during that year he studied with Clay on the application of his theories to news. The result was “Breaking News,” a piece for the fall issue of our sister publication Nieman Reports that outlines the hurdles and the possibilities. (You may remember an interview I did with the coauthors back in October.)

Last night, David came in from Toronto and Clay came in from across campus to talk to a crowd of about 70 about technological disruption in journalism. They were in conversation with Nieman Foundation curator Ann Marie Lipinski. It’s a great framing of disruption and definitely worth a listen.

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Horace Dediu: “Re-framing the dichotomies: Open/Closed vs. Integrated/Fragmented”

Photo of Christensen by World Economic Forum used under a Creative Commons license.

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-8-clay-christensen-on-the-disruption-of-journalism/feed/ 1 The Harvard Business School professor and David Skok discuss how news companies should respond to the Internet. The Harvard Business School professor and David Skok discuss how news companies should respond to the Internet. Nieman Journalism Lab no 1:29:38
Press Publish 7: Michael Maness on Knight Foundation’s priorities and how to ensure impact http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-7-michael-maness-on-knight-foundations-priorities-and-how-to-ensure-impact/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-7-michael-maness-on-knight-foundations-priorities-and-how-to-ensure-impact/#comments Wed, 20 Feb 2013 19:44:02 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=76341 michael-manessIt’s Episode 7 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Michael Maness, who leads the Journalism and Media Innovation program at the Knight Foundation.

If you pay much attention to the journalism innovation world — or if you’ve been reading this site for long — you know that Knight is the biggest of big dogs in the space. They give more than $30 million a year to a mixture of startups, news organizations, coding projects, and other ventures they believe will help support the information needs of communities. Name a prominent nonprofit news outlet or journalism school — or, increasingly, a news-related open source project — and there’s a pretty good shot Knight has either funded it or been asked to fund it. (That includes — disclosure! — this website, which has received Knight funding.) You could get a pretty good idea of the journalism-innovation zeitgeist just by looking at who Knight is funding at any given moment.

press-publish-logoMichael and I talked about how Knight decides on its journalism priorities, how those have shifted in recent years, and how they’re trying to ensure the projects they fund have impact beyond the length of a grant. If you’re interested in how journalism’s biggest foundation funder is thinking about the challenges in 2013, you should definitely give it a listen.

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Show notes

Michael Maness
@michaelmaness
Michael’s LinkedIn
Springfield News-Leader
Springfield (The Simpsons) — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
About Knight Foundation
John S. Knight
James L. Knight
Knight Communities
Code for America
Knight Chairs in Journalism
Knight News Challenge
Nieman Lab coverage of the Knight News Challenge
Alberto Ibargüen
Previous winners of the News Challenge
2010: “Trust, mobile, and money: New focal points (and hints for applicants) for the new Knight News Challenge”
2011 FCC report: “The Information Needs of Communities: The changing media landscape in a broadband age”
Texas Tribune
Knight’s 2009 grant to the Texas Tribune
2009: “Gary Kebbel on the Knight News Challenge: Repetitive ideas, tougher judges hurt some applicants”
Recovers.org
“Knight Foundation diversifies its journalism investments again with its new Prototype Fund”
“A new class of Knight News Challenge winners focuses on mobile in the developing world”
Ushahidi
International Center for Journalists
“One wonders whether ‘News’ Challenge will always remain the appropriate name.”
OpenIDEO
DocumentCloud
Scott Lewis vs. Scott Klein
EveryBlock
Knight’s 2007 $1.1 million grant for EveryBlock
Knight’s 2010 $235,000 grant for OpenBlock
Knight’s 2011 $275,000 grant for OpenBlock Rural
Mark Armstrong: “The death of EveryBlock and why I suddenly care about local”
“News Challenge on Open Gov: Submit now, not later”
Nieman Lab Book Club 2009: Jay Hamilton’s All the News That’s Fit to Sell: How the Market Transforms Information into News
Jay Hamilton, Duke University
Rachel Sterne Haot, chief digital officer, New York City
“A court case against those skeezy mugshot websites raises First Amendment issues”
“Journal News Gun Map Goes Out With A Bang: ‘We Do Not Cower’ To Bullies, Says Publisher”
Knight Media Learning Seminar 2013
“Beyond Lehrer: Some optimism in Miami around foundations helping fill community info needs”
Community Information Toolkit
2010: “Knight Foundation’s new biz consultant thinks news startups can learn from outside of journalism”
Peter Spear (@pspear)
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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-7-michael-maness-on-knight-foundations-priorities-and-how-to-ensure-impact/feed/ 4 The head of Knight's journalism initiatives talks about who it funds and how it tries to give its projects life beyond a grant's expiration date. The head of Knight's journalism initiatives talks about who it funds and how it tries to give its projects life beyond a grant's expiration date. Nieman Journalism Lab no 1:00:59
Press Publish 6: Rick Edmonds of Poynter on paywalls, print days, and the economics of newspapers http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-6-rick-edmonds-of-poynter-on-paywalls-print-days-and-the-economics-of-newspapers/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-6-rick-edmonds-of-poynter-on-paywalls-print-days-and-the-economics-of-newspapers/#comments Wed, 13 Feb 2013 17:08:09 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=76102 It’s Episode 6 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Rick Edmonds, Poynter’s media business analyst, and our topic is the business outlook for American newspapers.

Rick’s been writing about the business side of newspapers for many years, and in reading some of his recent work, I thought I’d detected a slight hint of optimism. Not full-blown excitement about the business future of newspapers, mind you — they’re still awfully challenged, by a host of factors — but a general feeling that a combination of paywall, ancillary products, and other strategies are, at least in places, helping steady a sector that has seen little but bad news over the past decade or so.

Rick and I had an informative conversation about the state of play around paywalls and digital advertising, where new strategies are being tried, and how they’re working. (We discuss The New York Times Co., MediaNews Group, Digital First, Journal Register, Gannett, Media General, the Columbus Dispatch, the Orange County Register, U-T San Diego, and more.) If you give it a listen, you’ll come out the other side smarter about how American newspapers are performing.

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Show notes

Rick Edmonds on Poynter
@RickEdmonds
Dec. 9, 2008: “Rick Edmonds predicts a lot of coal in newspapers’ stockings”
Poynter: “Newspapers report ad revenue loss for 25th quarter in a row”
Poynter: “At New York Times, 65% of digital-only subscribers are ‘entirely new'”
Poynter: “The case for paywalls: Gannett gains while Digital First experiments”
Poynter: “The tale of 3 paywalls: E.W. Scripps goes all in, Gannett brags, Washington Post thaws”
April 21, 2011: “A New York Times TimesSelect flashback: Early numbers are nice, but growth over time is nicer”
March 7, 2011: “Who owns newspaper companies? The banks, funds, and investors and their (big) slices of the industry”
Fast Company: “Why Dell Decided To Go Private”
Digital First CEO John Paton: “The Subscription Project — Or A Paywall By Any Other Name”
Jonathan Stray: “Focus and web-only content: How the Deseret News supports a local newsroom with a national strategy”
Ken Doctor: “The newsonomics of Advance’s New Orleans strategy”
Philip Meyer, The Vanishing Newspaper: Saving Journalism in the Information Age
Poynter: “New York Times suspends paywall for Hurricane Sandy”
Huffington Post: “New York Times Amps Up Paywall, Non-Subscribers Can Only Access 10 Articles Free”
“The Boston Globe tightens up as executives seek ‘the optimal balance’ between free and paid”
AJR, 2004: “Churn, Baby, Churn”
2004, St. Petersburg Times: “When newspapers fudge the numbers:
Alliance for Audited Media (formerly the Audit Bureau of Circulations)
2010: “How much can we trust e-edition numbers? Depends on the paper”
NAA’s John Murray talking to Rick about how Sunday circulation is counted
New York Times: “Newspapers Fighting Deal on Postage for Ad Fliers”
Groupon’s stock decline since IPO
“Lessons from the Motor City: What New Orleans might expect when the printing presses slow”
Ken Doctor: “The newsonomics of pressing innovation” (on the Columbus Dispatch/Cincinnati Enquirer format change)
The Berliner format at The Guardian
2010: “Doubling down on print: Canada’s Globe and Mail unveils a new print edition to complement the web”
2010: “Does investing in print help the bottom line? Discouraging evidence from the San Francisco Chronicle”
“Tuesday Q&A: Globe and Mail Publisher Phillip Crawley on the paper’s paywall plans”
Ken Doctor: “The newsonomics of Tribune’s metro agony”
Media General sells 63 newspapers to Warren Buffett
Ken Doctor: “The newsonomics of Aaron Kushner’s virtuous circles”
“The Orange County Register is hiring dozens of reporters, focusing on print-first expansion”
Ken Doctor: “The newsonomics of near-term numerology” (noting The Tampa Tribune’s $9 million sale)
2011: San Diego Union-Tribune sold to Doug Manchester
Poynter: “What to expect at next week’s big media investors’ conference & who will be missing”
Poynter: “For newspaper stocks, 2012 was a surprisingly good year”
Poynter: “Newspaper investor Randy Smith breaks silence to speak up for Gannett”
2011: “Alden Global Capital drops a shoe: Is the Journal Register acquisition prelude to more consolidation?”
Martin Langeveld: “Journal Register’s bankruptcy is strategic, all right — but for whom?”
Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism: Newspapers turning ideas into dollars
James “Scotty” Reston
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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-6-rick-edmonds-of-poynter-on-paywalls-print-days-and-the-economics-of-newspapers/feed/ 3 The newspaper business analyst talks about what revenue strategies are showing signs of life and whether the paywall model works for everyone. The newspaper business analyst talks about what revenue strategies are showing signs of life and whether the paywall model works for everyone. Nieman Journalism Lab no 57:10
Press Publish 5: C.W. Anderson on metro newspapers’ decline http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-5-c-w-anderson-on-metro-newspapers-decline/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-5-c-w-anderson-on-metro-newspapers-decline/#comments Wed, 06 Feb 2013 14:30:27 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=75782 chanders-newIt’s Episode 5 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Chris Anderson, author of the new book Rebuilding the News: Metropolitan Journalism in the Digital Age.

Chris — you’ll know his byline as C.W. Anderson, since contemporary American journalism and technology is silly with Chris Andersons — has written a book that looks at how the Philadelphia media market was affected by (and responded to) the rise of online journalism. He spent months inside the city’s major newsrooms, at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News, and among the bloggers, startups, and other new players introduced to the media ecosystem by the web’s lowering of barriers to publication.

How did reporters’ conceptions of themselves change with the new competition for their audiences’ attention? How did they differentiate what they did from what others did — and who was willing to steal a few tricks from the bloggers? How did journalists take advantage (or not) of new opportunities to collaborate?

Chris and I had a good, vigorous discussion about how his thinking about traditional media institutions evolved during his research, about how Internet-native approaches to news had trouble penetrating the Inquirer building, and whether or not “post-industrial” really describes the phase journalism’s going through. (He also outs himself as a confirmed Weberian.)

Aside from this book and his other writing at Nieman Lab and elsewhere, Chris has been part of two of the most important state-of-the-news reports of recent years: 2009’s Downie-Schudson report (Chris was a research assistant on it) and 2012’s “Post-Industrial Journalism,” coauthored with Emily Bell and Clay Shirky. By day, he’s an assistant professor of media culture at CUNY’s College of Staten Island, a visiting fellow at Yale’s Information Society Project, and a Knight Media Policy Fellow at the New America Foundation.

This was a fun one — give it a listen.

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Show notes

C.W. Anderson

@chanders on Twitter

Rebuilding the News: Metropolitan Journalism in the Digital Age

“How journalists’ self-concepts hindered their adaptation to a digital world,” an excerpt from Rebuilding the News

“The public is still a problem, and other lessons from Rebuilding the News,” Chris’ reflections on the book

Community organizing — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chris’s articles for Nieman Lab

Alternative media — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Democracy Now!

WBAI Free Speech Radio

Objectivity (journalism) — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”

Ethnography — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Haddon Township, New Jersey, “where community thrives”

The Wired City, Dan Kennedy’s upcoming book on local journalism in New Haven, Conn.

Herbert J. Gans, author of the classic ’70s news ethnography Deciding What’s News

The Philadelphia Inquirer

Philadelphia Daily News

Alex Jones’ “iron core of journalism”

Len Downie and Michael Schudson’s 2009 report “The Reconstruction of American Journalism” (Chris was a research assistant on it)

“Post-Industrial Journalism,” the 2012 report by Chris, Emily Bell, and Clay Shirky (see the section on institutions)

Nieman Lab gloss on “Post-Industrial Journalism”

“Local journalism’s vision of itself — as an institutionally grounded profession that empirically informs (and even, perhaps, ‘assembles’) the public — is a noble vision of tremendous democratic importance. But the unreflexive commitment to a particular and historically contingent version of this self-image now undermines these larger democratic aspirations.”

Philebrity

Mass media — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Publics — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David Simon in 2009: “The day I run into a Huffington Post reporter at a Baltimore zoning board hearing is the day I will no longer be worried about journalism.”

My talk at Harvard Law in 2010 on journalists’ conception of aggregation

Will Bunch’s blog Attytood

Noblesse oblige

Philly.com, the joint site of The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

NetNewsCheck, Dec. 10: “Inquirer, Daily
News to split from Philly.com”

“Tuesday Q&A: Bill Marimow on his new old job, and the future of the Philadelphia Inquirer”

Charlie Beckett on networked journalism

PBS MediaShift’s Collaboration Central

Jeff Jarvis, 2007: “Cover what you do best. Link to the rest.”

Max Weber — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“[Weber] notes that the instability of charismatic authority forces it to ‘routinise’ into a more structured form of authority.”

Philadelphia newspapers sold in 2006 for $515 million, in 2010 for $139 million, and in 2012 for $55 million

Photo by Jessica Kaufman.

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/02/press-publish-5-c-w-anderson-on-metro-newspapers-decline/feed/ 1 The author of "Rebuilding the News: Metropolitan Journalism in the Digital Age" talks about what he saw in Philadelphia as the business came tumbling down. The author of "Rebuilding the News: Metropolitan Journalism in the Digital Age" talks about what he saw in Philadelphia as the business came tumbling down. Nieman Journalism Lab no 1:10:00
Press Publish 4: Trei Brundrett on how Vox Media has built a web-native media company with editorial ambition http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-4-trei-brundrett-on-how-vox-media-has-built-a-web-native-media-company-with-editorial-ambition/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-4-trei-brundrett-on-how-vox-media-has-built-a-web-native-media-company-with-editorial-ambition/#comments Wed, 30 Jan 2013 15:39:22 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=75412

It’s Episode 4 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Trei Brundrett, the VP for product and technology at Vox Media.

Vox is the publisher of the sports site SB Nation, the tech site The Verge, and video game site Polygon, and it’s one of my very favorite online media companies. I love that they’re ambitious on content — building a quality mix of short and long, user-generated and pro-generated, aggregated and original — and that they’re ambitious on technology. And they make money. To me, Vox feels like one of a very few online media companies that is both native to the web and invested in some traditional values about quality. They’re worth watching, even if you have no interest at all in sports, tech, or video games.

Trei started out in the world of politics and helped build SB Nation to the point that it could evolve into Vox. When Adweek named him to its Adweek 50 (“the people who make the machinery of media, marketing and technology hum”), this is what they said about him:

Under Brundrett’s direction, Vox Media has evolved into one of the most agile Web-based publishers. Building a proprietary content management platform, his technology powers the journalists of The Verge, Polygon and over 300 SB Nation fan-created media properties. Focused on functional and design-rich technology, Brundrett and Vox have pushed past conventional Web design with efforts such as StoryStream, which populates a writer’s updates in real time to provide an organized and intuitive history of complex breaking news.

We had a good, wide-ranging conversation about Vox’s evolution and where it’s headed in 2013. Give it a listen, and I hope (if you haven’t already) you’ll subscribe to Press Publish in the podcast app of your choice.

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Show notes

@clockwerks, Trei on Twitter
Trei’s resume
Vox Media
SB Nation, Vox’s sports site
The Verge, Vox’s tech site
Polygon, Vox’s gaming site
Vox Media 2012 By the Numbers (185 employees; 389,692 pieces of content; 35,412,480 comments)
Chorus, Vox Media’s proprietary backend
Vox Media’s product team blog
Markos Moulitsas
Jerome Armstrong
Tyler Bleszinski
Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.)
Ryan Gantz
Daily Kos
Daily Kos’ diaries
Trei in an Astros hat
Scoop CMS
Slashdot
Rusty Foster
“For once, Nick Denton seems pleased with Gawker’s commenting system”
Canal Street Chronicles, an example of a SB Nation community site
Jim Bankoff, Vox CEO
Content management systems
Nieman Lab stories on Jim Bankoff and Vox
An example of a SB Nation player page
An example of a Verge product page
An example of a Polygon game page
An example of The Verge’s product comparison tool
The Verge’s features page
Vox Product blog: “An inside peek into the Polygon design process”
An example of a templated, less-“designed” feature: “After Aaron: how an antiquated law enables the government’s war on hackers, activists, and you”
An example of a more designed feature: “For Amusement Only: the life and death of the American arcade
An example of a Verge review (of the iPad mini)
Source’s interview with Vox staff on building the arcades feature
A few videos from Vox Studios, Vox’s “in-house creative and production group” that does work for both editorial and business-side
An episode of “90 Seconds on The Verge,” the site’s daily video briefing
An episode of “On The Verge,” the site’s late-night-talk-show-style program, hosted by Josh Topolsky, with example of an integrated sponsorship from Ford (go to 45:50)
The New York Times’ Snow Fall package
An example of a SB Nation Storystream, on the Pro Bowl
SB Nation United, the site’s recent rebranding and visual unification
The Atlantic’s Scientology sponsored-content snafu
SB Nation’s Marines sponsored-content package
SB Nation user SDCat09, who has left 227,399 comments (at this writing)
“How We Moderate Here On SB Nation”
The Verge iPhone app
Editable comments
The Verge’s iPad mini liveblog
An example of a Vox review that’s been revised over time

Photo by @nivshah used under a Creative Commons license.

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-4-trei-brundrett-on-how-vox-media-has-built-a-web-native-media-company-with-editorial-ambition/feed/ 1 Vox's VP for product and technology talks about the importance of community, the value of long features, and the role of sponsored content. Vox's VP for product and technology talks about the importance of community, the value of long features, and the role of sponsored content. Nieman Journalism Lab no 1:10:13
Press Publish 3: Jay Rosen on the public, how the press thinks, and the production of innocence http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-3-jay-rosen-on-the-public-how-the-press-thinks-and-the-production-of-innocence/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-3-jay-rosen-on-the-public-how-the-press-thinks-and-the-production-of-innocence/#comments Wed, 23 Jan 2013 14:00:09 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=75078 It’s Episode 3 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Jay Rosen, the NYU journalism professor and thinker about the ways of journalism.

Given that journalism is a profession centered around the idea of an audience, it’s a little bit disappointing how few journalism academics ever feel much need to engage with the general public. And the names that might come to mind as exceptions to that — Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman — were more fundamentally interested in media than in journalism proper. That’s why Jay has been so valuable to the field and, I’d argue, the profession — he’s an inside-outside voice pricking journalism when it needs to be pricked. His ideas, once shouted down in newsrooms, have become something closer to received wisdom for many. He’s changed the way people think about political reporting in particular, and he’s built an audience of his own for his thinking, both in and out of journalism.

My conversation with Jay touched on a lot of subjects: his entry into first journalism and then the journalism academy; the influence of James Carey, Postman, and McLuhan on his work; the Lippmann-Dewey debate and the changing conception of “the public” in journalism; the rise and quasi-fall of civic journalism; why we need a better horse-race journalism; how the press’ conception of itself evolves; how he’s trying to model a different kind of journalism education; whether I’m too much of a pessimist; and what he’d like to be remembered for. It’s an idea-packed hour; I think you’ll like it.

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Show notes

Jay Rosen’s college yearbook photo, 1978
“Why I am Not a Journalist: A True Story” (2010)
Nat Hentoff — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Press Clips, Village Voice
Wayne Barrett — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Neil Postman — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Monocle, the magazine Postman, Victor Navasky, and others founded
James W. Carey — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Publics — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Michael Schudson, “The ‘Lippmann-Dewey Debate’ and the Invention of Walter Lippmann as an Anti-Democrat 1986-1996″ (2008)
“Jay Rosen on James Carey: An Appreciation” (2006)
“PressThink: An Introduction” (2003)
The four Twitter accounts that are followed by more than 10 percent of @NiemanLab’s followers
Civic journalism — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
U.S. newspaper circulation per 100 households, 1945-2009
“The Mutualized Future is Bright,” Alan Rusbridger, CJR (2009)
What Are Journalists For?, Jay’s book (1999)
Jay’s bio: “Rosen wrote and spoke frequently about civic journalism (also called public journalism) over a ten-year period, 1989-99.”
“I Think Mr. McLuhan Is Trying To Tell Us Something,” Sylvan Meyer, Nieman Reports, June 1969
Christopher Lasch — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Argument Over Information,” Gerald Graff (2008)
The Church of the Savvy: “This is part of what’s so insidious about press savviness: it tries to hog realism to itself” (2009)
Horse race journalism — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lucas Graves on the rise of fact-checkers
Romney pollster Neil Newhouse: “we’re not going to let our campaign be dictated by fact-checkers.”
“‘CNN Leaves it There’ is Now Officially a Problem at CNN” (2011)
It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism, Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein
New York Times Co. v. Sullivan — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Why Political Coverage is Broken” (2011) (“the production of innocence”)
Studio 20 at NYU
The Local East Village at The New York Times
“‘Post-Industrial Journalism': A new Columbia report examines the disrupted news universe”
C.W. (Chris) Anderson
Mark Coddington
Jonathan Stray
Greg Linch
Daniel Victor
Marshall McLuhan — Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-3-jay-rosen-on-the-public-how-the-press-thinks-and-the-production-of-innocence/feed/ 2 The NYU professor and scholar talks about his intellectual influences, how he thinks the press did in 2012, and how much of an audience there'll be for civic-minded journalism. The NYU professor and scholar talks about his intellectual influences, how he thinks the press did in 2012, and how much of an audience there'll be for civic-minded journalism. Nieman Journalism Lab no 1:07:31
Press Publish 2: Karen McGrane on building a strategy for mobile http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-2-karen-mcgrane-on-building-a-strategy-for-mobile/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-2-karen-mcgrane-on-building-a-strategy-for-mobile/#comments Wed, 16 Jan 2013 15:33:11 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=74649

It’s Episode 2 of Press Publish, the Nieman Lab podcast! My guest this week is Karen McGrane. She’s a content strategist and user experience designer who’s worked with a number of media companies — The New York Times, Condé Nast, The Atlantic, Time Inc., and others. (She was the design lead on the Times’ 2006 redesign — which, with a few accumulated tweaks, is still the basis of what NYTimes.com looks like today.)

Karen’s got a great new book out that I’d recommend you check out: Content Strategy for Mobile.

I think a lot of people would benefit from reading it — it’s not a technical book about building a mobile website. It’s more about the backend than the frontend; it’s about how publishers should structure their content — from workflows to tools to processes — to enable that content to flow across multiple platforms. In other words, if you view your task as optimizing for iPhone screens or Galaxy S III screens, you’re making the same mistake as when you optimized for desktop browsers. You will have to deal with new platforms in 2013 that you haven’t yet heard of, and being agile with your content is more important than picking a platform or two and building for them.

Karen and I also talk a bit about the basics of content strategy, new startups like Circa and Summly, responsive web design, and the possibilities (and absurdities) of responsive text. Hope you enjoy. (By the way, Wednesday is the day I’ll be aiming to put out a new episode each week.)

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Show notes

Karen McGrane
@karenmcgrane
Karen’s book, Content Strategy for Mobile
Razorfish
Content strategy
Karen’s “Adapting Ourselves to Adaptive Content,” An Event Apart Boston, 2012
The Daily
Blobs vs. chunks
Tumblr
Patrick LaForge: “Writers wonder why editors trim stories in the online report. Answer: Reader patience online is even more precious than newsprint space.”
Highlights from NPR in Karen’s book
Smashing Magazine: “Is There Ever a Justification for Responsive Text?”
Frankie Roberto’s demo of responsive text (resize the width of the browser window and watch what happens to the text to see)
Inverted pyramid
Karen’s “Your Content, Now Mobile,” A List Apart
Responsive web design
Circa
Summly

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-2-karen-mcgrane-on-building-a-strategy-for-mobile/feed/ 4 The content strategist and UX designer says that mobile will be the fulcrum to push smart publishers to restructure their content for a multi-platform future. The content strategist and UX designer says that mobile will be the fulcrum to push smart publishers to restructure their content for a multi-platform future. Nieman Journalism Lab no 52:34
Press Publish 1: Dan Sinker and Erin Kissane of Source on the community of news developers http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-1-dan-sinker-and-erin-kissane-of-source-on-the-community-of-news-developers/ http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-1-dan-sinker-and-erin-kissane-of-source-on-the-community-of-news-developers/#comments Thu, 10 Jan 2013 02:21:34 +0000 http://www.niemanlab.org/?p=74339 I’m very excited to welcome you to Press Publish, our brand new weekly Nieman Lab podcast.

Here’s the deal: At Nieman Lab, I’m very lucky to be able to talk with a lot of smart people engaged in building the future of news. Journalists, technologists, business-side folks, entrepreneurs, academics: They each have different angles on where we’re headed and how they’re trying to get us there. I’ve always wanted a forum to have longer conversations with these people — to nerd out with them, really — and share them with our audience.

So that’s what Press Publish will be: a weekly conversation with the people making the future of news.

We’ll be putting out a new episode every week, and they’ll usually average 45 minutes to an hour. (Great for commutes!) My hope is that, if you listen regularly, you’ll get a good sweep of the many ways news is changing — and also that you’ll get to hear from a lot of interesting people.

A quick note: Most episodes of Press Publish will be at least a little bit nerdy. This one gets a little nerdy about code; future episodes might be nerdy about advertising formats or workflows or analytics or academia. I’ll do my best to make sure it all remains accessible, but, hey — nerding out is what we aim to do here. I think part of our mission is to be a center point for different kinds of nerds to learn from each other, and I hope Press Publish will be part of that. Also, with each episode I’ll pull out links to all the things we talk about and include them in the Show Notes section below.

Episode 1: Dan Sinker and Erin Kissane

Dan Sinker and Erin Kissane are two of the key people behind Source, the new(ish) site from Knight-Mozilla OpenNews. Here’s how they describe it:

Source is a Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project designed to amplify the impact of journalism code and the community of developers, designers, journalists, and editors who make it.

They do that by assembling a big, living repository of journalistic code, interviewing developers about how they did certain things, highlighting community events, and more. It’s pretty great for those of us are interested in the code side of journalism — and it’s definitely worth watching if you want to keep up with that rapidly developing space.

I talked with Dan and Erin about how Source came to be, how they designed a content strategy for it, how they’ve tried to work with the existing community of news devs, and how the journalism+code equation is evolving.

Listen

Download the MP3

Or listen in your browser:
[See post to listen to audio]

Subscribe in iTunes

Subscribe (RSS)

Show notes

Source
Dan Sinker
Erin Kissane
@dansinker
@kissane
Punk Planet
The F***ing Epic Twitter Quest of @MayorEmanuel
Contents Magazine
The Elements of Content Strategy
A List Apart
Knight-Mozilla OpenNews
Django
Underscore.js
Backbone.js
D3.js
CoffeeScript
Jeremy Ashkenas
Agile software development
Krista Stevens
Scott Klein
Brian Boyer
Joe Germuska
Heather Billings
Ryan Pitts
OpenNews Learning
Erika Owens
GitHub
Responsive IFrames
TimelineJS
Simple Tiles
2012 MIT-Knight Civic Media Conference
Tang (which wasn’t invented by or for NASA, actually)
Knight-Mozilla OpenNews’ News Developer Portraits
News Developer Portraits: Jeremy Ashkenas, New York Times
Jacob Harris
Source on The New York Times’ election results loader
Mike Bostock
Source on The New York Times’ 512 Paths to the White House
Source coverage of the 2012 elections
Source coverage of Hurricane Sandy
Source’s “People” content type
Chris Groskopf
Biella Coleman
Coleman, “Three Ethical Moments in Debian”
IETF language tags
Playdoh
Miguel Paz
Prose.io
Versioned writing

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http://www.niemanlab.org/2013/01/press-publish-1-dan-sinker-and-erin-kissane-of-source-on-the-community-of-news-developers/feed/ 6 In the first episode of our new weekly Nieman Lab podcast, we look at how they built a central gathering point for news devs and how they're trying to pull coders into journalism. In the first episode of our new weekly Nieman Lab podcast, we look at how they built a central gathering point for news devs and how they're trying to pull coders into journalism. Nieman Journalism Lab no 58:12