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Real News About Fake News

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Plus: A French law against fake news during elections; Facebook meets with its fact-checkers; fake news jeans.
A few thoughts from an exhausting year in fake news (or whatever we end up calling it next year).
Plus: How political information gets distorted as it spreads from person to perso, and new research on trust in social media vs. branded apps.
Plus: Fake news probably didn’t swing the election, political polarization is nothing new, and Kara Swisher’s kid.
Plus: The EU is surveying its citizens on fake news; what CrossCheck learned in France; the upcoming Disinformation Action Lab.
Plus: Google’s new but fairly useless “knowledge panels,” bots spreading misinformation in local races, and: When is misinformation most dangerous?
Plus: Facebook, Google, and Twitter face Congress, and new research into the spread of misinformation on WeChat.
Plus: Platforms scramble to do something about shady political ads before Congressional hearings start, and is fake news better thought of as “disinformation advertising”?
Plus: A former Russian troll speaks out; a definition of disinformation; Wikitribune’s preferred news sources.
Plus: Facebook is just fixing a bug (right!), labeling fake news seems to work, and lawmakers will release the Russia ads.
Plus: How news organizations could work together to stop the spread of misinformation during breaking news events; fighting fake news on WhatsApp.
Also: Mark Zuckerberg has regrets, and the Russians’ role as cultural flame-fanners.
“Disinfobros.” Also: Snopes gets fact-checked about its own history, and Mark Zuckerberg is transformed by a meeting with a Waco minister.
Plus: “The year’s most consequential storylines have collided,” the differences between “observational” and direct correction, and one more trip to Macedonia.
Plus: Facebook sold (at least?) $100,000 worth of political ads to Russia, and its factchecking partners are annoyed again.