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Americans don’t really like the media much — unless it’s their go-to news outlets you’re asking about
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Real News About Fake News

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Plus: A new report on the many types of trolls, and what happens when fact and fiction get blended together.
Plus: A quick way to make money off other people’s content, an invitation to fact-check U.K. local news, and BuzzBeed vs. BuzzFeed.
Plus: An investigation into fake news in the French presidential election.
There are a lot of reasons, though, that Facebook and Google are compelled to act.
Plus: The New York Times walks back an extremely popular tweet, California adds media literacy to its curriculum, and the KIND Foundation tries out a “Pop Your Bubble” app that nobody is going to want to use.
Plus: Facebook buys some print ads in Germany, research on the polarizing effects of social media, and sometimes it’s not fake news — it’s just good old fabrication.
Plus: Some fake sites are still sneaking onto big ad networks, Facebook pushed news literacy, and Germany gets serious about social networks removing content.
Plus: A lot of junk news on Election Twitter in Michigan, the AP pushes for clarity, and fifth graders get better at B.S. detection.
Plus: LinkedIn claims it doesn’t have a fake news problem, Facebook’s “disputed story” alerts are spotted in the wild, and middle schoolers get trained to be skeptical.
Plus: The science of why we spread stories, Russian propaganda gets into fake news, and a “satirical” fake news site pulls the plug after Whoopi Goldberg calls it out.
Plus: European investigations, the complexities of fact-checking “fact-based opinions”, and how kids deal with fake news.
“Trump really does polarize people’s views of reality.”
“Putting others’ words in quotation marks, to signal, ‘We don’t know if this is true, we’re just telling you what they said’ or even ‘Nudge, nudge, we know this isn’t true,’ is a journalistic cop-out.”