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Real News About Fake News

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Plus: What people who like fact-checking are like, a new “digital deception” newsletter, and Facebook expands its fact-checking partnerships beyond the West.
Plus: A proposal to let Facebook users come up with “formulas” for their own News Feeds, and what happens to fake news when it isn’t profitable anymore?
Hint: Facebook is involved. Plus: Sketchy government efforts against fake news (or “fake news”) in India and Malaysia.
Data that NewsWhip pulled together for Nieman Lab suggests that popular hyperpartisan publishers are actually doing pretty well post–algorithm change.
Plus: Facebook found (and shut down) a Macedonian disinformation effort in the Alabama special election, and Facebook groups could get garbage-y fast.
Plus: YouTube’s sad reliance on Wikipedia, a problem with Pinterest, and how countries around the world are fighting misinformation.
Plus: A big overview of all the research that we have so far.
Plus: Outrage-tweeting is a dangerous thing, and why we have to teach students not to be “trust misers.”
Plus: Screen time debates, and what the data says about kids and smartphones.
Plus: The lines between “fake news” and psyops, the Russians shared real news too, and “reality apathy.”
Plus: The Brits come to the U.S. to grill tech execs, and spammers come to Instant Articles.
For example: How could we increase public demand for fact-based information? Would incentives work?
Plus: A French law against fake news during elections; Facebook meets with its fact-checkers; fake news jeans.
A few thoughts from an exhausting year in fake news (or whatever we end up calling it next year).
Plus: How political information gets distorted as it spreads from person to perso, and new research on trust in social media vs. branded apps.