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If you’re poor in the UK you get less, worse news — especially online, new research suggests
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Real News About Fake News

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

“Why give them the ammo?”
Plus: A woman-oriented fact-checking initiative, and possible problems with California’s media literacy bill.
Plus: A U.K. report calls for governments to tread cautiously when it comes to fake news, as some other governments seem prepared to do the opposite.
Plus: How YouTubers spread far-right beliefs (don’t just blame algorithms), and another cry for less both-sides journalism.
Should one partisan news outlet be able to wield power over another, using Facebook as the cudgel?
Plus: Who tweets anti-vaccine content, and watch out for “misinfodemics.”
Plus: Does all our yammering about fake news make people think real news is fake?
Plus: “Most of the people reviewing Burmese content spoke English.”
Plus: Infowars’ Alex Jones is suspended from Facebook, eyes on Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop, and anti-vaccine Facebook groups.
Plus: Anger trumps love (in Facebook reactions to legislators’ posts), the most-shared news sources on right-wing social network Gab, and connections between Macedonian teens and U.S. conservatives.
Plus: (Some) researchers can now get access to (some) Facebook data, WhatsApp is funding misinformation research too, and susceptibility to fake news may have more to do with laziness than partisanship.
Plus: Facebook fights fake news in Mexico ahead of the election, and a large majority of Republicans believe that social media platforms are censoring some political views.
Plus: Facebook expands its fact-checking program; for one thing, it now covers photos and video.
Plus: Facebook looks to hire “news credibility specialists,” and Reuters tries to figure out if highly partisan sites are gaining traction in and outside the U.S. (it looks as if they’re not).
Plus: Qatari bots, Swedish pamphlets, and French laws.