about  /   archives  /   contact  /   subscribe  /   twitter    
Share this entry
Make this entry better

What are we missing? Is there a key link we skipped, or a part of the story we got wrong?

Let us know — we’re counting on you to help Encyclo get better.

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Key links:
Primary website:
bloomberg.com
Primary Twitter:
@BloombergNews

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

Bloomberg is a financial news and data company founded in 1981 and primarily owned by billionaire and New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg.

The vast majority of Bloomberg’s $8.3 billion in 2013 revenue — 82 percent, as of 2012 — are tied to its $20,000-per-year financial data terminals used by 318,000 subscribers as of 2014, but the company’s news division also has 2,400 editorial employees, more than The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal. The company laid off just under 40 employees, especially in its culture and sports departments, in late 2013. It also consolidated its employees more heavily in its New York offices in 2014, after a decade-long emphasis on political coverage based in Washington.

Bloomberg News provides business and financial news through a wire service and Bloomberg Markets magazine, and as of 2014, that division had 2,400 newsroom employees. In January 2010, Bloomberg began a partnership with the Washington Post News Service.

Bloomberg released a free iPad app modeled after its terminals. The company has considered charging as much as $1,000 per year to some of the content on its website.

After complaints by clients, Bloomberg News acknowledged in 2013 its journalists had long used its terminals to gather information on its users for reporting. The terminal use was part of a company-wide focus on data-gathering and internal “transparency” along with external secrecy.

Bloomberg’s social media guidelines, leaked in April 2011, encourage journalists to use Twitter but restrict the ways in which they can do so.

In 2013, Bloomberg Media Group hired as its CEO Justin B. Smith, who had engineered The Atlantic’s digital resurgence. The next year, Smith hired high-profile political journalists John Heilemann and Mark Halperin to head up a new politically focused site called Bloomberg Politics.

In January 2011, Bloomberg launched Bloomberg Government, or BGov, a website that covers business and politics for subscription fees of thousands of dollars a year. Four months later, it launched an online opinion section called Bloomberg View. In 2012, View had a staff of about 20 and 1.6 million monthly unique visitors. Bloomberg also re-launched its free politics page in 2012.

Bloomberg launched a venture capital fund called Bloomberg Beta in 2013 to invest in startups, including some that Bloomberg News covers.

In 2009 Bloomberg bought the weekly magazine BusinessWeek for $5 million from McGraw-Hill.

Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
April 19, 2017 / Shan Wang
This handy little tool draws from Bloomberg data to add financial context on top of any news article — The United Airlines debacle earlier this month began with Chicago Aviation Police forcibly dragging a 69-year-old passenger from a flight and continued through a week of facepalm-worthy PR moves and unified public outrag...
Dec. 5, 2016 / Shan Wang
Josh Topolsky’s The Outline officially launches and it burns the eyes (but the ad experience does look cool) — If you were confused what The Outline, the ambitious new digital media project from The Verge and Bloomberg veteran Josh Topolsky, was supposed to be (or look like), its official launch today offers some clarity (its pub...
Nov. 8, 2016 / Shan Wang
As seen on TV: For the TV-less viewer, live election night shows abound, on any number of screens — You absolutely, categorically, without a doubt have not seen enough coverage of this election. TV networks are expecting all-time highs in viewership on Tuesday night, the culmination of a presidential election cycle tha...
Oct. 11, 2016 / Shan Wang
Bloomberg’s new global chief of digital innovation on the company’s careful hunt for new audiences — Ensconced within the larger Bloomberg empire, Bloomberg’s editorial operations are in an enviably comfortable position. “If you look at our approach at how we play on platforms that we don’t own, compar...
Oct. 11, 2016 / Nicholas Quah
Hot Pod: Gimlet risks its image as scrappy and transparent by mishandling a show cancellation — Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue ninety-one, published October 11, 2016. Growing Up Gimlet. Okay, there’s a lot baked into this story and I’m still processing, so this isn’...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Mark Coddington. Main text last updated: August 14, 2014.
Make this entry better
How could this entry improve? What's missing, unclear, or wrong?
Name (optional)
Email (optional)
FiveThirtyEight logo

FiveThirtyEight is an American political blog, written by Nate Silver and currently hosted by the New York Times, that analyzes polling data. Originally, the site was launched anonymously in 2008 after Silver had been posting statistical poll analysis as an anonymous diarist at the liberal blog Daily Kos, beginning in late 2007. Silver revealed his…

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
Some rights reserved. Copyright information »