about  /   archives  /   contact  /   subscribe  /   twitter    
Share this entry
Make this entry better

What are we missing? Is there a key link we skipped, or a part of the story we got wrong?

Let us know — we’re counting on you to help Encyclo get better.

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Key links:
Primary website:
cir.ca
Primary Twitter:
@circa

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

Circa is a mobile-only app for reading news that presents stories as collections of facts from various sources.

For its focus on presenting news the way readers want it on their phones—in short chunks, added to as a story changes—Circa has been hailed as an example of the “post-article” news world. Its minimalist design breaks stories up into pieces easily viewable on a phone screen. Users can follow stories of interest and receive updates as new facts, statistics, or images are added. Circa relies heavily on aggregation while using editors to string together the content.

The app was founded by Cheezburger Network’s Ben Huh and launched in October 2012. It released an updated focused on breaking news a year later.

By June 2013, the company employed 14 people producing 40 to 60 stories every day.

Peers, allies, & competitors:
Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
May 23, 2017 / Laura Hazard Owen
Now you can take a 24-hour Trump news “snooze” on the Quartz app — If you’ve started feeling panicky every day between 5 and 6 p.m. because the volume of Trump news and notifications are just too much, there is a solution for you in the Quartz iPhone app: The app was updated Tuesd...
May 23, 2017 / Shan Wang
Who’s really driving traffic to articles? Depends on the subject: Facebook (lifestyle, entertainment) or Google (tech, business, sports) — When you’re publishing to Facebook, or tweaking a headline to align with some carefully honed SEO strategy, how closely do you take note of story topic? New research from Parse.ly suggests that news organizations t...
May 23, 2017 / Shan Wang
This contest is looking for more ideas on innovative ways to present factchecks (grand prize: $10,000) — If most fact-checking as it’s presented to readers today bores you, now’s your chance to figure out more exciting formats — and maybe win a big cash prize doing it. The International Center for Journalists ...
May 23, 2017 / C.W. Anderson
What an academic hoax can teach us about journalism in the age of Trump — Call it, if you like, a replication experiment. Twenty-one years ago, the New York University physicist Alan Sokal attempted to prove that the influence of postmodern ways of thinking in the humanities had reached the po...
May 23, 2017 / Laura Hazard Owen
Scribd says it has over 500,000 subscribers paying $8.99/month for ebooks, audiobooks, and now news — Scribd’s $8.99/month subscription service started out with only ebooks. Over time, it’s expanded to audiobooks, sheet music, documents, magazines — and, as of Tuesday, newspapers. “Select articlesR...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Sarah Darville. Main text last updated: June 13, 2014.
Make this entry better
How could this entry improve? What's missing, unclear, or wrong?
Name (optional)
Email (optional)
Explore: EveryBlock
EveryBlock logo

EveryBlock is a site owned by Comcast that collects and sorts local news data and hosts community conversation on a block-by-block level. The site ran from 2008 to 2013 — owned most of that time by msnbc.com — before closing and being relaunched in 2014 by Comcast. The site was launched in 2008 by Chicago-based journalist and developer Adrian…

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
Some rights reserved. Copyright information »