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Primary website:
cpb.org
Primary Twitter:
@CPBmediaroom

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting is an organization that distributes the federal government’s money to public media organizations.

Founded in 1967, CPB is the main funding source for more than 1,000 public radio and television stations. Its funding supports well-known PBS, NPR, and PRI shows, including PBS NewsHour, Frontline, All Things Considered, and Marketplace.

CPB is also a funding source for future-of-journalism experiments and collaborative projects, like NPR’s Project Argo, which received $2 million from CPB, and Localore, a series of local multimedia projects that received $1.25 million from CPB. NPR’s Code Switch and a number of multi-station Local Journalism Centers have also been funded by CPB.

Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
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With $4.5 million, Knight is launching a new commission — and funding more new projects — to address declining public trust in media — A lot more resources are going into addressing the problem of the American public’s withering trust in media institutions. The Knight Foundation is doling out $2.55 million in new funding to support major projects ...
Sept. 22, 2017 / Ricardo Bilton
News verification platform Truly Media wants to help German news orgs combat fake news ahead of Germany’s election — News organizations in Germany are trying to ensure that the fake news scourge that afflicted the 2016 U.S. election doesn’t spread to the German elections taking place this Sunday. German Press Agency dpa and publi...
Sept. 22, 2017 / Laura Hazard Owen
Stop giving photoshoots and admiring profiles to bros who make AdSense cash writing fake news — The man behind Snopes. Michelle Dean profiles Snopes publisher David Mikkelson in Wired. “He’s got the world­view of Eeyore, had Eeyore been obsessed with cataloging the precise history, variety, and growing...
Sept. 21, 2017 / Laura Hazard Owen
AI is going to be helpful for personalizing news — but watch out for journalism turning into marketing — What are the most useful ways to bring artificial intelligence into newsrooms? How can journalists use it in their reporting process? Is it going to replace newsroom jobs? A report out this week from the Tow Center for D...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Sarah Darville. Main text last updated: July 12, 2015.
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Explore: The Batavian
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The Batavian is an online local news organization run by Howard Owens in Batavia, N.Y. The site was launched in May 2008 by the newspaper chain GateHouse Media as an experiment in online-only local journalism. Owens, who helped start the site as a GateHouse executive, left the company to take the Batavian over in February…

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Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
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