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Key links:
Primary website:
mashable.com
Primary Twitter:
@mashable

Mashable is a blog that covers social media news and analysis.

The blog was founded in 2005 by Pete Cashmore, who was 19 at the time. Cashmore said in 2008 that Mashable had been profitable since its inception without the need for venture funding. Mashable first took on outside funding when it raised $13.3 million for a significant expansion.

Mashable is the largest tech blog on the web and among the most influential blogs overall. As of 2009, it brought in seven-figure annual revenue through advertising and events and now has a staff of about 40. The site has grown significantly in the past several years, partly because of the extensive sharing of its articles on social media. In 2011, it expanded its coverage to include entertainment and world news. Beginning in 2012, it began running some content from the Atlantic and that National Journal on its site.

In early 2012, Mashable was reported multiple times to be in talks to sell to CNN for as much as $200 million.

Mashable’s content combines original reporting, aggregation, and analysis with a focus on utility for readers.

Video:

A 2008 Beet.tv interview with Cashmore:

Peers, allies, & competitors:
Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
April 14, 2014 / Caroline O'Donovan
What’s the return on investment for news video? Tow looks at strategies in 125 newsrooms across the country — Columbia’s Tow Center has a new report out today on how publishers are actually dealing with video. Many newsrooms have made video a major focus and are pinning their hopes for revenue on the medium. Columbia assis...
March 17, 2014 / Caroline O'Donovan
Know which way the wind blows: Journalists need to think more critically about weather maps — Everybody’s talking about the weather. Weather.com is exploding with content, from longform to short docs to clickbait. Gawker just started a weather blog called The Vane. BuzzFeed recently launched BuzzFeed Storm ...
Aug. 29, 2013 / Ken Doctor
The newsonomics of big and little, from NBC News and GlobalPost to Thunderdome — Ah, the joys of big and of little. In media businesses, little means few if any layers of bothersome decision-making. Agility. Nimbleness. Independence. All great and positive values. But little can also mean limited rea...
April 11, 2013 / Ken Doctor
The newsonomics of recycling journalism — There’s an important number in his week’s first-of-its-kind Newspaper Association of America report — The American Newspaper Media Industry Revenue Profile 2012 — on the evolution of revenue sources. That...
June 29, 2011 / Megan Garber
Ben Parr, romantic swing dancer: Google now highlights individual authors in its search returns — Yesterday evening, just hours after it rolled out its long-awaited social layer, Google launched another new feature that will affect its search returns — and journalists. In a pilot program, Google is now highlighting...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Mark Coddington. Main text last updated: January 9, 2014.
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Next Door Media is a network of neighborhood-level news sites in Seattle. Next Door Media was founded in 2007 by local television journalists Cory and Kate Bergman as the hyperlocal blog My Ballard. The site added the blog PhinneyWood in early 2008 and by 2010 had expanded to include 10 sites covering north Seattle neighborhoods….

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